Catalogue


The decline of the castle /
M.W. Thompson.
imprint
Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1987.
description
vii, 211 p. : ill., maps, facsims.
ISBN
0521321948
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1987.
isbn
0521321948
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
2485512
 
Bibliography: p. 200-202.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 1988
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Extensively illustrated with photographs, plans and period engravings, Michael Thompson's book examines the decline of the castle as both fortification and seigneurial residence over the two and a half centuries that preceded the Civil War. In general, this was a period in which function played less and less part and display - even fantasy - ever more in the minds of castle builders.
Main Description
Extensively illustrated with photographs, plans and period engravings, Michael Thompson's book examines the decline of the castle as both fortification and seigneurial residence over the two and a half centuries that preceded the Civil War. In general, this was a period in which function played less and less part and display - even fantasy - ever more in the minds of castle builders. Although few new castles were built in England after 1400, the growing power of artillery and continuing warfare in Scotland and across the Channel in France continued to provide stimuli to fresh architectural development. Dr Thompson relates alterations in design to contemporary social changes and devotes particular attention to the rapid decline of Tudor times and to the massive destruction wrought by Parliamentary forces during the Civil War and Commonwealth. A concluding chapter examines the enticing quality the image of the castle has continued to hold over the intervening three centuries and examines some remarkable latterday examples of the genre, among them Burges' Castell Coch in Glamorgan and, in this century, Lutyens' Castle Drogo.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Fifteenth-century contrasts
Warfare in England and France
A rival - the courtyard house
A martial face
Accelerating decay
A continuing theme
Destruction
Nostalgia
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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