Catalogue


America's Germany : John J. McCloy and the Federal Republic of Germany /
Thomas Alan Schwartz.
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1991.
description
xiii, 404 p., [14] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0674031156 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1991.
isbn
0674031156 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
2482405
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [313]-320) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1990-12:
From 1949 to 1952, McCloy was Allied High Commissioner for Germany, and Schwartz contends that he represented the best of the ``wise men'' of that era of American foreign policy. McCloy contributed greatly to the birth of a West Germany integrated closely with the free world. If the Cold War did not lead to a ``United States of Europe,'' as many wished at the time, it was not McCloy's fault. Schwartz tells the story of West Germany's rebirth as a nation by examining developments during McCloy's era in such areas as politics, economics, and rearmament. If this timely, scholarly treatise has any flaws, it is that the separate treatment of each area fails to show their interrelationships adequately. Recommended for academic libraries.-- Pat Ensor, Indiana State Univ. Lib., Terre Haute (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 1991-07:
Rarely is the title of a book so felicitous. Schwartz focuses on the formative first years of the German Federal Republic between 1949 and 1955, when West Germany moved from a physically and morally prostrate nation under the dictate of military occupation governments to sovereignty and full integration in the Western community of nations. In this transformation the American High Commissioner in Germany from 1949 to 1952, John J. McCloy, played a critical role as a powerful and creative mediator between the three Western Allies and the fledgling, initially quite tenuous, West German government of Konrad Adenauer. Although much of the book's general story is known from classic studies on US foreign policy and German political history, an analysis from the vantage point of McCloy's work, where all the threads of German politics and Allied German and European policies intersected, permits Schwartz to offer a closer, more "local" look, especially at the adoption of the Schuman Plan, the building of a German military role into a European framework, the 1951 payments crisis, and Stalin's 1952 note offering free elections for German unification. An impressively broad archival research base, intelligent analysis, and a pleasant writing style make this a most attractive book. All levels. -D. Prowe, Carleton College
Reviews
Review Quotes
The time is long overdue for a major study of McCloy. This is it. By focusing on Germany, which McCloy was so influentially involved for most of his life, the author makes a significant contribution to the study of U.S.-European relations in a crucial period.
An impressive achievement in terms of both its scholarly quality and the breadth of its research effort...Schwartz's study is comprehensive and rich in detail. It presents a great deal of new material and casts fresh light on aspects of the German-American relationship in the 1950s.
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, December 1990
Choice, July 1991
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
America's Germany is the first study of McCloy's critical years in Germany. Drawing on deep archival research and interviews, Thomas Schwartz argues that McCloy played a decisive role in the American effort to restore democracy and integrate Germany into Western Europe.
Main Description
John J. McCloy was the "wise man" of the Cold War era who had the longest substantial American connection with Germany. A self-made man of great ambition, enormous vitality, and extraordinary tenacity, McCloy served in several government positions before being appointed High Commissioner of Germany in 1949.America's Germany is the first study of McCloy's critical years in Germany. Drawing on deep archival research and interviews, Thomas Schwartz argues that McCloy played a decisive role in the American effort to restore democracy and integrate Germany into Western Europe. Convinced that reunification should wait until Germany was firmly linked to the West, McCloy implemented a policy of "dual containment," designed to keep both the Soviet Union and Germany from dominating Europe.McCloy represented the best and the worst of the values and beliefs of a generation of American foreign policy leaders. He strove to learn from the mistakes made in the aftermath of the collapse of the Weimar Republic, when the West did not do enough to help German democracy survive. Yet his leniency toward convicted Nazi war criminals compromised the ideals for which America had fought in World War II.America's Germany offers an essential history for those wishing to understand the recent changes in Germany and Europe. The book describes a unique period in the relationship between America and Germany, when the two nations forged an extraordinary range of connections--political, economic, military, and cultural--as the Federal Republic became part of the Western club and the new Europe.
Main Description
John J. McCloy was the "wise man" of the Cold War era who had the longest substantial American connection with Germany. A self-made man of great ambition, enormous vitality, and extraordinary tenacity, McCloy served in several government positions before being appointed High Commissioner of Germany in 1949. America's Germany is the first study of McCloy's critical years in Germany. Drawing on deep archival research and interviews, Thomas Schwartz argues that McCloy played a decisive role in the American effort to restore democracy and integrate Germany into Western Europe. Convinced that reunification should wait until Germany was firmly linked to the West, McCloy implemented a policy of "dual containment," designed to keep both the Soviet Union and Germany from dominating Europe. McCloy represented the best and the worst of the values and beliefs of a generation of American foreign policy leaders. He strove to learn from the mistakes made in the aftermath of the collapse of the Weimar Republic, when the West did not do enough to help German democracy survive. Yet his leniency toward convicted Nazi war criminals compromised the ideals for which America had fought in World War II. America's Germany offers an essential history for those wishing to understand the recent changes in Germany and Europe. The book describes a unique period in the relationship between America and Germany, when the two nations forged an extraordinary range of connections--political, economic, military, and cultural--as the Federal Republic became part of the Western club and the new Europe.
Table of Contents
Preface
The Making of a High Commissioner
Changing of the Guard
Avoiding the Fate of Weimar: The Petersburg Protocols
Monnet and the Schuman Plan
The Dilemmas of Rearmament
Dealing with the Past: Moral Integration
Ties That Bind: Economic Integration
The Skeleton Key: Military Integration
How Free Should the Germans Be? Political Integration
The New Look: Eisenhower and Dulles, 1953-1955
Conclusions: European Unity, Dual Containment, and the American ""Empire""
Abbrevi
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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