Catalogue

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Discourses of martyrdom in English literature, 1563-1694 /
John R. Knott.
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1993.
description
xv, 278 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521433657
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1993.
isbn
0521433657
catalogue key
247897
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 262-271) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Representations of persecution and martyrdom in 16th- and 17th-century England helped shape a lasting ideal of protestant heroism by recreating a drama of suffering learned from the Bible. This book examines the subversive potential of John Foxe's Acts and Monuments (the Book of Martyrs), alongside the work of Milton, Bunyan, George Fox and others.
Description for Bookstore
Representations of persecution and martyrdom in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England helped shape a lasting ideal of Protestant heroism by recreating a drama of suffering learned from the Bible. This book examines the subversive potential of John Foxe's Acts and Monuments (the Book of Martyrs), alongside the work of Milton, Bunyan, George Fox and others.
Description for Library
Representations of persecution and martyrdom in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England helped shape a lasting ideal of protestant heroism by recreating a drama of suffering learned from the Bible. This book examines John Foxe's Acts and Monuments (the Book of Martyrs), revealing its subversive potential by exploring how it furnished a discourse of martyrdom for those resisting the authority of the church. This first extensive treatment of the literature of persecution in Renaissance England also engages with the work of Milton, Bunyan, George Fox and others.
Main Description
Representations of persecution and martyrdom in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England helped shape a lasting ideal of Protestant heroism. This book shows how Protestant writers tried to recreate a drama of suffering learned from the Bible and from accounts of the primitive church. It examines John Foxe's Acts and Monuments (the Book of Martyrs), second only to the Bible in importance for English Protestants of the period, revealing the subversive potential of the work by exploring how it furnished a discourse of martyrdom for those wishing to resist the authority of the church. Professor Knott also traces Milton's complex negotiations with Foxe and ideas of martyrdom, and engages with the work of the Elizabethan Separatists, William Prynne, John Bunyan, the Quaker leader George Fox, and the hymn-writer Isaac Watts. This is the first extensive treatment of the literature of persecution in Renaissance England.
Table of Contents
John Rogers and the drama of martyrdom
Heroic suffering
The holy community
Separatists and factious fellows
Milton and martyrdom
Bunyan and the language of martyrdom
George Fox and Quaker sufferings
Epilogue: The hymns of Isaac Watts
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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