Catalogue


Recollections of a southern daughter : a memoir by Cornelia Jones Pond of Liberty County /
edited by Lucinda H. MacKethan.
imprint
Athens : University of Georgia Press, c1998.
description
xlvi, 118 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0820320447 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Athens : University of Georgia Press, c1998.
isbn
0820320447 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
2471004
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This memoir begins in 1834, when Cornelia James Pond was born to one of the Old South's wealthiest plantation families, and it ends in 1875, when she was a 41-year-old wife and mother trying to cope in the post-Civil War south.
Main Description
Recollections of a Southern Daughter recalls life in antebellum Liberty County, Georgia, a time and place best known today through the letters of the Charles Colcock Jones family, published in the classic Children of Pride , and the letters and journals of the Roswell King, Fanny Kemble, and Joseph LeConte families. In this memoir Cornelia Jones Pond gives an eyewitness account of how the privileged life of the southern slaveholding class was destroyed by a whirlwind of change. Pond's narrative begins in 1834, when she was born to one of the Old South's wealthiest plantation families. It ends in 1875, when she was a forty-one-year-old minister's wife and the mother of four daughters, trying to make her way in the drastically changed post-Civil War South. She began dictating her memoir to her daughter Anne in 1899, when she was sixty-five years old, and the handwritten manuscript eventually found its way to the Midway Church Museum. This is the first unabridged edition of Pond's memoir, and it includes notes, genealogy, and an extensive introduction by Lucinda H. MacKethan. In Recollections of a Southern Daughter Pond renders with striking immediacy and affectionate detail not only her personal past but also the tremendous upheavals of history that she witnessed firsthand. Many of the experiences recorded here parallel those depicted in Children of Pride, thus extending our knowledge of the people of this region, their values, their everyday concerns, and the national drama that engulfed their families in the years of civil war.
Main Description
Recollections of a Southern Daughterrecalls life in antebellum Liberty County, Georgia, a time and place best known today through the letters of the Charles Colcock Jones family, published in the classicChildren of Pride, and the letters and journals of the Roswell King, Fanny Kemble, and Joseph LeConte families. In this memoir Cornelia Jones Pond gives an eyewitness account of how the privileged life of the southern slaveholding class was destroyed by a whirlwind of change.Pond's narrative begins in 1834, when she was born to one of the Old South's wealthiest plantation families. It ends in 1875, when she was a forty-one-year-old minister's wife and the mother of four daughters, trying to make her way in the drastically changed post-Civil War South. She began dictating her memoir to her daughter Anne in 1899, when she was sixty-five years old, and the handwritten manuscript eventually found its way to the Midway Church Museum. This is the first unabridged edition of Pond's memoir, and it includes notes, genealogy, and an extensive introduction by Lucinda H. MacKethan.InRecollections of a Southern DaughterPond renders with striking immediacy and affectionate detail not only her personal past but also the tremendous upheavals of history that she witnessed firsthand. Many of the experiences recorded here parallel those depicted in Children of Pride, thus extending our knowledge of the people of this region, their values, their everyday concerns, and the national drama that engulfed their families in the years of civil war.
Unpaid Annotation
Recollections of a Southern Daughter recalls life in antebellum Liberty County, Georgia, a time and place best known today through the letters of the Charles Colcock Jones family, published in the classic Children of Pride, and the letters and journals of the Roswell King, Fanny Kemble, and Joseph LeConte families. In this memoir Cornelia Jones Pond gives an eyewitness account of a how the privileged life of the southern slaveholding class was destroyed by a whirlwind of change.Pond's narrative begins in 1834, when she was born to one of the Old South's wealthiest plantation families. It ends in 1875, when she was a forty-one-year-old minister's wife and the mother of four daughters, trying to make her way in the drastically changed post-Civil War South. She began dictating her memoir to her daughter Anne in 1899, when she was sixty-five years old, and the handwritten manuscript eventually found its way to the Midway Church Museum. This is the first unabridged edition of Pond's memoir, and it includes notes, genealogy, and an extensive introduction by Lucinda H. MacKethan.In Recollections of a Southern Daughter Pond renders with striking immediacy and affectionate detail not only her personal past but also the tremendous upheavals of history that she witnessed firsthand. Many of the experiences recorded here parallel those depicted in Children of Pride, thus extending our knowledge of the people of this region, their values, their everyday concerns, and the national drama that engulfed their families in the years of civil war.
Unpaid Annotation
The life story of a daughter of pride, from a privileged antebellum childhood to Civil War deprivation.

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