Catalogue

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Robert Frost and feminine literary tradition /
Karen L. Kilcup.
imprint
Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, c1998.
description
ix, 322 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0472109677 (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, c1998.
isbn
0472109677 (acid-free paper)
contents note
Introduction: "Plainly the most deceptive poet" -- "The faded flowers gay": feminine Frost and the sentimental tradition -- "The feminine way of it": Frost's homely affiliations -- "Lightning or a scribble": bewitched by the mother tongue -- "Button, button-- ": becoming a man's man -- "No sissy poem": reinventing the (lyric) poet -- Coda: "An impregnable harbor for the self".
catalogue key
2395149
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 245-308) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-07-01:
Although Frost achieved a great deal of popular recognition during his lifetime as the consummate Yankee poet, his reputation among academic scholars has suffered somewhat since his death in 1963. Kilcup (Univ. of North Carolina) addresses this question in part by focusing on the literary technique and tone associated with women writers who inspired Frost. She shows how Frost adapted and modified the influences of women writers such as Lydia Sigourney, Sarah Orne Jewett, and Mary E. Wilkins Freeman. Frost's contemporaries, T.S. Eliot and Ezra Pound--"difficult," modern, and masculine--have fared better with academic critics, Kilcup suggests, because unlike Frost, these poets avoided the affective and emotional voice associated with the "sentimental" or feminine strains of US literature. Readers familiar with the dark, ironic, and humorous perspectives on life readily found in Frost's poetry are likely to be surprised by all of this. But they will also be refreshed. Kilcup's argument represents a unique application of gender scholarship, one that broadens understanding of modernism and the construction of gender in literary studies. Most useful at the graduate and research level. P. J. Ferlazzo Northern Arizona University
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This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 1999
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Summaries
Main Description
In spite of Robert Frost's continuing popularity with the public, the poet remains an outsider in the academy, where more "difficult" and "innovative" poets like T. S. Eliot and Ezra Pound are presented as the great American modernists. Robert Frost and Feminine Literary Tradition considers the reason for this disparity, exploring the relationship between notions of popularity, masculinity, and greatness. Karen Kilcup reveals Frost's subtle links with earlier "feminine" traditions like "sentimental" poetry and New England regionalist fiction, traditions fostered by such well-known women precursors and contemporaries as Lydia Sigourney, Sarah Orne Jewett, and Mary E. Wilkins Freeman. She argues that Frost altered and finally obscured these "feminine" voices and values that informed his earlier published work, and that to appreciate his achievement fully, we need to recover and acknowledge the power of his affective, emotional voice in counterpoint and collaboration with his more familiar ironic and humorous tones. Robert Frost and Feminine Literary Tradition also explores the links between cultural femininity and homoeroticism in Frost's work, and investigates the conjunctions and disjunctions between Frost and such modernist women poets as Amy Lowell and Edna St. Vincent Millay. The book contributes to ongoing debates about sentimentalism, regionalism, modernism, and the cultural construction of gender in American literature of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. With its interest in popular magazines, folktales, gossip, and children's literature, the book also engages elements of cultural studies and popular culture. "Kilcup demonstrates a remarkably thorough understanding of issues raised by feminist critics over the past few decades. . . . Fascinating and convincing." --Jay Parini, Middlebury College Karen L. Kilcup is Associate Professor of American Literature, University of North Carolina, Greensboro.
Main Description
In spite of Robert Frost's continuing popularity with the public, the poet remains an outsider in the academy, where more "difficult" and "innovative" poets like T. S. Eliot and Ezra Pound are presented as the great American modernists. Robert Frost and Feminine Literary Traditionconsiders the reason for this disparity, exploring the relationship between notions of popularity, masculinity, and greatness. Karen Kilcup reveals Frost's subtle links with earlier "feminine" traditions like "sentimental" poetry and New England regionalist fiction, traditions fostered by such well-known women precursors and contemporaries as Lydia Sigourney, Sarah Orne Jewett, and Mary E. Wilkins Freeman. She argues that Frost altered and finally obscured these "feminine" voices and values that informed his earlier published work, and that to appreciate his achievement fully, we need to recover and acknowledge the power of his affective, emotional voice in counterpoint and collaboration with his more familiar ironic and humorous tones. Robert Frost and Feminine Literary Traditionalso explores the links between cultural femininity and homoeroticism in Frost's work, and investigates the conjunctions and disjunctions between Frost and such modernist women poets as Amy Lowell and Edna St. Vincent Millay. The book contributes to ongoing debates about sentimentalism, regionalism, modernism, and the cultural construction of gender in American literature of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. With its interest in popular magazines, folktales, gossip, and children's literature, the book also engages elements of cultural studies and popular culture. "Kilcup demonstrates a remarkably thorough understanding of issues raised by feminist critics over the past few decades. . . . Fascinating and convincing." --Jay Parini, Middlebury College Karen L. Kilcup is Associate Professor of American Literature, University of North Carolina, Greensboro.
Main Description
In spite of Robert Frost's continuing popularity with the public, the poet remains an outsider in the academy, where more "difficult" and "innovative" poets like T. S. Eliot and Ezra Pound are presented as the great American modernists.Robert Frost and Feminine Literary Traditionconsiders the reason for this disparity, exploring the relationship between notions of popularity, masculinity, and greatness. Karen Kilcup reveals Frost's subtle links with earlier "feminine" traditions like "sentimental" poetry and New England regionalist fiction, traditions fostered by such well-known women precursors and contemporaries as Lydia Sigourney, Sarah Orne Jewett, and Mary E. Wilkins Freeman. She argues that Frost altered and finally obscured these "feminine" voices and values that informed his earlier published work, and that to appreciate his achievement fully, we need to recover and acknowledge the power of his affective, emotional voice in counterpoint and collaboration with his more familiar ironic and humorous tones. Robert Frost and Feminine Literary Traditionalso explores the links between cultural femininity and homoeroticism in Frost's work, and investigates the conjunctions and disjunctions between Frost and such modernist women poets as Amy Lowell and Edna St. Vincent Millay. The book contributes to ongoing debates about sentimentalism, regionalism, modernism, and the cultural construction of gender in American literature of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. With its interest in popular magazines, folktales, gossip, and children's literature, the book also engages elements of cultural studies and popular culture. "Kilcup demonstrates a remarkably thorough understanding of issues raised by feminist critics over the past few decades. . . . Fascinating and convincing." --Jay Parini, Middlebury College Karen L. Kilcup is Associate Professor of American Literature, University of North Carolina, Greensboro.
Table of Contents
Abbreviations
Introduction: "Plainly the Most Deceptive Poet"p. 1
"The Faded Flowers Gay": Feminine Frost and the Sentimental Traditionp. 17
"The Feminine Way of It": Frost's Homely Affiliationsp. 61
"Lightning or a Scribble": Bewitched by the Mother Tonguep. 103
"Button, Button ...": Becoming a Man's Manp. 147
"No Sissy Poem": Reinventing the (Lyric) Poetp. 191
Coda: "An Impregnable Harbor for the Self"p. 233
Notesp. 245
Indexp. 309
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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