Catalogue

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The President as interpreter-in-chief /
Mary E. Stuckey.
imprint
Chatham, NJ : Chatham House Publishers, c1991.
description
x, 182 p. --
ISBN
0934540926
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chatham, NJ : Chatham House Publishers, c1991.
isbn
0934540926
catalogue key
2390501
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Booklist, March 1992
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Summaries
Authored Title
Examines the relationship between mass media and modern U.S. presidents.
Main Description
"Stuckey's perceptive study of presidential rhetoric shows how technological changes have emptied presidential discourse of political substance, weakening American democracy. Her fascinating, widely ranging book is essential reading for presidency watchers, media scholars, and everyone who cares about the quality of American politics." - Doris A. Graber University of Illinois at Chicago
Main Description
"Stuckey's perceptive study of presidential rhetoric shows how technological changes have emptied presidential discourse of political substance, weakening American democracy. Her fascinating, widely ranging book is essential reading for presidency watchers, media scholars, and everyone who cares about the quality of American politics." Doris A. Graber University of Illinois at Chicago
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction The President as Interpreter-In-Chiefp. 1
Political Rhetoric in the Premodern United Statesp. 10
Summary and Conclusionsp. 27
The Development of Mass-Mediated Politics: Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Trumanp. 29
Conclusionsp. 49
The Birth of Televised Politics: Dwight D. Eisenhower and John F. Kennedyp. 51
Conclusionsp. 68
Television and Personality: Lyndon B. Johnson and Richard M. Nixonp. 69
Conclusionsp. 89
The Issue of Control: Gerald R. Ford and Jimmy Carterp. 91
Condusionsp. 112
Mastering Televised Politics: Ronald Wilson Reagan and George Herbert Walker Bushp. 114
Conclusionsp. 132
(almost) Everything Old is New" Again: The Consequences of Televised Politics"p. 133
Notesp. 143
Bibliographyp. 170
Indexp. 179
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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