Catalogue


Negotiating democracy : politicians and generals in Uruguay /
Charles Guy Gillespie.
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1991.
description
xiii, 264 p. ; 24 cm. --
ISBN
0521401526
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1991.
isbn
0521401526
catalogue key
2388524
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1992-07:
Writing about the breakdown of a liberal democratic political system and its subsequent transition back to democracy, Gillespie convincingly argues that the small nation of Uruguay represented a special case in Latin American democracy prior to the military coup of 1973. He credits this exceptionality to the lack of a tradition of military involvement in the nation's politics and the strength of its competitive party system. That the most stable Latin American democracy succumbed to military rule was the result of a number of factors, including the development of ideological extremism within the political parties and other groups, economic crises, political violence, and an expanded military concern with national security issues. The transition back to democratic rule would be a tortuous process, painstakingly detailed by Gillespie. The bulk of the book is devoted to an examination of the key role of the political parties in returning Uruguay to democracy. The myriad personalities, the strategies of the various political parties, and the eventual compromise hammered out between the military and the political parties would lead to a peaceful political liberalization. Gillespie concludes by urging more comparative analyses of the role of political parties in democratic transitions. A worthwhile book for all library collections.-L. Chen, Indiana University at South Bend
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This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 1992
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Uruguay was once the most stable democracy in Latin America, but in 1973 the military seized power for the first time. Political parties did not disappear, however, even though they were made illegal. By the 1980s Uruguay's generals were anxious to find a way to withdraw from power. Yet they continued to insist on certain guarantees as the price for holding elections.
Main Description
Uruguay was once the most stable democracy in Latin America, but in 1973 the military seized power for the first time. Political parties did not disappear, however, even though they were made illegal. By the 1980s Uruguay's generals were anxious to find a way to withdraw from power. Yet they continued to insist on certain guarantees as the price for holding elections. The issue of whether to make any concessions to the military came to divide the country's three major parties--the Blancos, the Colorados, and the Left. Nevertheless, the latter two parties eventually did agree to a pact in July 1984. The military agreed to return to the barracks and the politicians made an implicit commitment not to prosecute them for their past human rights violations.
Description for Library
Uruguay was once the most stable democracy in Latin America, but in 1973 the military seized power for the first time. Political parties did not disappear, however, even though they were made illegal. By the 1980s Uruguay's generals were anxious to find a way to withdraw from power. Yet they continued to insist on certain guarantees as the price for holding elections. The issue of whether to make any concessions to the military came to divide the country's three major parties - the Blancos, the Colorados, and the Left. Nevertheless, the last two parties eventually did agree to a pact in July 1984. The military agreed to return to the barracks and the politicians made an implicit commitment not to prosecute them for their past human rights violations.
Table of Contents
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction: political parties, theories of regime change, and the Uruguayan case
The Crisis and Survival of Uruguayan Political Parties
Politicians and parties in Uruguay: origins and crisis
The breakdown of democracy
The failure of military institutionalization and politial engineering: the survival of political parties
From Authoritarian Crisis To Transition
Attempts at party renewal: from above and below
Party and military strategies in the 'dialogue': from partial opening to confrontation after the Parque Hotel talks
From mobilization to negotiation: the exhaustion of alternatives
The Naval Club pact: party and military strategies in the transition
Political Parties And Democratic Consolidation
The competition for support: leadership strategies and electoral behaviour before and after the 1984 electrons
The legacies of authoritarianism and the challenges for democracy
Conclusion
Appendix
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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