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Losing a continent : France's North American policy, 1753-1763 /
Frank W. Brecher.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 1998.
description
viii, 229 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0313307865 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 1998.
isbn
0313307865 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
2375250
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [205]-220) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-03-01:
The Anglo-French struggle for the mastery of much of North America, one of modern history's magnificent stories, has attracted the attention of great historians including Lawrence Henry Gipson and Francis Parkman. The largest and most far-reaching conflict in the series of Franco-British wars, the Seven Years' War, or French and Indian War, which ended in 1762/63, is the subject of Brecher's book. In 13 relatively brief chapters and a conclusion, the author examines reasons for the decisive defeat of Louis XV's France, a loss that foreshadowed the American Revolution. Although it is refreshing to read about the mighty war from a French vantage point, it is unfortunate that Brecher did not use more recent scholarship (e.g., Jonathan Dull's A Diplomatic History of the American Revolution, CH, Jan'86, and John Ferling's Struggle for a Continent, 1993). Brecher's study has a short bibliography, maps, endnotes, and very brief biographic data on leading figures but no illustrations. Of limited interest to academic audiences. C. L. Egan; University of Houston
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 1999
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text provides a full-scale analysis of the political, military, social and economic conditions of mid-18th century France and its North American colony, New France.
Long Description
England's capture of Canada in 1760 was the culmination of the French and Indian War and of a century and a half of conflict between Britain and France for control of the North American continent. During that long period, there were several English military efforts to evict the French, but all failed. Therefore, at the war's start, few among the English entertained serious thoughts of totally evicting France from all of Canada. Nor did the French consider such a result a serious possibility. Drawing heavily on primary sources, Brecher tells the dramatic story of why the war's outcome differed so sharply from original expectations. He does so from the vantage point of France, while demonstrating in greater depth than has been available to date the linkages between France's American policy and involvement in the Seven Years' War. Brecher provides an unprecedently full-scale analysis of the political, military, social, and economic conditions of mid-18th-century France and its North American colony, New France. That analysis also examines the direct connection between those internal conditions and the results for France of the war that ended in 1763. In doing so, Brecher assesses France's military strategy and major battles in Europe and America, as well as the diplomatic goals Versailles set for itself in the conduct of the war. Further, he describes why France concurred in leaving not only Canada, but also the vast Louisiana territory, to be divided between England and France's belated wartime ally, Bourbon Spain. Finally, Brecher explains the longer-term implications of the war for North American development and for the future of France. This is an important study for students and scholars of French and colonial American history and for the broad reading public, as well as those interested in the more recent "Quebec problem."
Long Description
England's capture of Canada in 1760 was the culmination of the French and Indian War and of a century and a half of conflict between Britain and France for control of the North American continent. During that long period, there were several English military efforts to evict the French, but all failed. Therefore, at the war's start, few among the English entertained serious thoughts of totally evicting France from all of Canada. Nor did the French consider such a result a serious possibility. Drawing heavily on primary sources, Brecher tells the dramatic story of why the war's outcome differed so sharply from original expectations. He does so from the vantage point of France, while demonstrating in greater depth than has been available to date the linkages between France's American policy and involvement in the Seven Years' War. Brecher provides an unprecedently full-scale analysis of the political, military, social, and economic conditions of mid-18th-century France and its North American colony, New France. That analysis also examines the direct connection between those internal conditions and the results for France of the war that ended in 1763. In doing so, Brecher assesses France's military strategy and major battles in Europe and America, as well as the diplomatic goals Versailles set for itself in the conduct of the war. Further, he describes why France concurred in leaving not only Canada, but also the vast Louisiana territory, to be divided between England and France's belated wartime ally, Bourbon Spain. Finally, Brecher explains the longer-term implications of the war for North American development and for the future of France. This is an important study for students and scholars of French and colonial American history and for the broad reading public, as well as those interested in the more recent Quebec problem.
Unpaid Annotation
Brecher provides an unprecedentedly full-scale analysis of the political, military, social, and economic conditions of mid-18th-century France and its North American colony, New France. That analysis also examines the direct connection between those internal conditions and the results for France of the war that ended in 1763. In doing so, Brecher assesses France's military strategy and major battles in Europe and America, as well as the diplomatic goals Versailles set for itself in the conduct of the war. Further, he describes why France concurred in leaving not only Canada, but also the vast Louisiana territory, to be divided between England and France's belated wartime ally, Bourbon Spain. Finally, Brecher explains the longer-term implications of the war for North American development and for the future of France.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
The International Setting on the Eve of Warp. 17
Bourbon France at Mid-Centuryp. 35
The Opening Moves toward War, 1753-1754p. 47
War Comes to Francep. 65
Drawing the Lines in North America, 1755p. 81
The French and Indian War Begins in Earnest, 1755p. 89
The Fully Military Phase, 1756-1757 (Part One)p. 103
The Fully Military Phase, 1756-1757 (Part Two)p. 115
The Fully Military Phase, 1758-1762 (Part One)p. 133
The Fully Military Phase, 1758-1762 (Part Two)p. 143
The Politics and Diplomacy of War and Peace, 1754-1761p. 157
The Politics and Diplomacy of War and Peace, 1762-1763p. 169
Conclusionsp. 183
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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