Catalogue


Government by polemic : James I, the king's preachers, and the rhetorics of conformity, 1603-1625 /
Lori Anne Ferrell.
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, c1998.
description
ix, 231 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0804732213 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, c1998.
isbn
0804732213 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
2373458
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [213]-226) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
This book is a study of the Anglican Church in the Jacobean period, a time of central importance in English religious and political history. By looking at official words instead of official deeds, the author challenges the recent revisionist position, made by both Anglican apologists and historians, that the reign of James I was an era of religious consensus and political moderation. Analyzing sermons preached and then ordered into print by the king, the book demonstrates that the Jacobean claim to "moderation" and the pursuit of a so-called via media were rhetorical strategies aimed at isolating Elizabethan-style Calvinist reformers and alienating their supporters. Utilizing sources drawn from history, literature, and religion, this interdisciplinary work combines rhetorical and historical analysis in discussing the major religious and political issues of the period: the union with Scotland, the Gunpowder Plot, the Oath of Allegiance controversy, and the forceful elaboration of anti-Puritanism and ceremonialism in the Church of England. Throughout, the author presents evidence for her claim that the discourse of government is the substance of government.
Reviews
Review Quotes
". . . . [Represents] an important step forward in our understanding of Jacobean politics and religion."Sixteenth Century Journal
". . . . [Represents] an important step forward in our understanding of Jacobean politics and religion."-- Sixteenth Century Journal
"This is an important study in two respects. First, it completes the overthrow of what has been the dominant interpretation of early Stuart ecclesiastical politics. At the same time, it is an exemplary study of the way discursive strategies should be related historically to the politics of the time."Paul S. Seaver, Stanford University
"This is an important study in two respects. First, it completes the overthrow of what has been the dominant interpretation of early Stuart ecclesiastical politics. At the same time, it is an exemplary study of the way discursive strategies should be related historically to the politics of the time."--Paul S. Seaver, Stanford University
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
"This is an important study in two respects. First, it completes the overthrow of what has been the dominant interpretation of early Stuart ecclesiastical politics. At the same time, it is an exemplary study of the way discursive strategies should be related historically to the politics of the time."Paul S. Seaver, Stanford University ". . . . [Represents] an important step forward in our understanding of Jacobean politics and religion."Sixteenth Century Journal
Main Description
This book is a study of the Anglican Church in the Jacobean period, a time of central importance in English religious and political history. By looking at official words instead of official deeds, the author challenges the recent revisionist position, made by both Anglican apologists and historians, that the reign of James I was an era of religious consensus and political moderation. Analyzing sermons preached and then ordered into print by the king, the book demonstrates that the Jacobean claim to "moderation" and the pursuit of a so-called via mediawere rhetorical strategies aimed at isolating Elizabethan-style Calvinist reformers and alienating their supporters. Utilizing sources drawn from history, literature, and religion, this interdisciplinary work combines rhetorical and historical analysis in discussing the major religious and political issues of the period: the union with Scotland, the Gunpowder Plot, the Oath of Allegiance controversy, and the forceful elaboration of anti-Puritanism and ceremonialism in the Church of England. Throughout, the author presents evidence for her claim that the discourse of government is the substance of government.
Back Cover Copy
"This is an important study in two respects. First, it completes the overthrow of what has been the dominant interpretation of early Stuart ecclesiastical politics. At the same time, it is an exemplary study of the way discursive strategies should be related historically to the politics of the time."--Paul S. Seaver, Stanford University ". . . . [Represents] an important step forward in our understanding of Jacobean politics and religion."--Sixteenth Century Journal
Bowker Data Service Summary
Government by Polemic analyses the major political and religious forces reflected in the writings of the day during the reign of James I. The author shows how Jacobean claims to moderation were designed to isolate Elizabethan-style Calvinist reformers.
Table of Contents
A Note on the Text
Government by Polemicp. 1
Sermons on Political Occasions
Two Churches or One? The Accession of James VI and Ip. 27
Rewriting the Plot: The Fifth of November and the Image of Puritanismp. 64
Two Images of Rule
Great Britain's Constantinep. 113
Kneeling and the Body Politicp. 140
The Politics of Memoryp. 167
Notesp. 179
Bibliographyp. 213
Indexp. 227
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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