Catalogue


The medieval castle in England and Wales : a social and political history /
N.J.G. Pounds.
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1990.
description
xvii, 357 p. : ill., maps ; 26 cm.
ISBN
0521383498
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1990.
isbn
0521383498
catalogue key
2364153
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 301-342) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1991-10:
Pounds (Indiana University, emeritus, and past president of the Royal Archaeological Institute) brings to this book a wealth of knowledge and an abundance of common sense. He looks at English and Welsh (and some Scottish) castles built from the 11th through the 15th century and relates them to the context of their times and the circumstances of their builders. Pounds sees a castle, not as a sterile edifice of timber or stone, but rather, as a home for its owner or his representative, which may mirror the power and wealth of its master; a structure that could serve to one degree or another as a place of protection; a building functioning as an administrative center for a designated region. Castles varied considerably with place and time in their form and function, and Pounds explores this rich diversity in lucid prose. Anyone curious about military architecture will benefit from reading this book. Many appropriate illustrations; extensive endnotes; useful index. Highly recommended for upper-division undergraduates and above. -A. C. Reeves, Ohio University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Beautifully produced and lavishly illustrated.' The Black Countryman
'Beautifully produced and lavishly illustrated.'The Black Countryman
‘Beautifully produced and lavishly illustrated.’The Black Countryman
'... deserves a place in every library as the most comprehensive and carefully considered attempt yet made ... '. The Times Literary Supplement
'... deserves a place in every library as the most comprehensive and carefully considered attempt yet made ... '.The Times Literary Supplement
‘… deserves a place in every library as the most comprehensive and carefully considered attempt yet made … ’.The Times Literary Supplement
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 1991
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This pioneering book examines the role of the castle in the Norman conquest of England and in the subsequent administration of the country.
Description for Library
This original and pioneering book examines the role of the castle in the Norman conquest of England and in the subsequent administration of the country. The castle is seen primarily as an instrument of peaceful administration which rarely had a garrison and was more often where the sheriff kept his files and employed his secretariat. In most cases the military significance of the castle was minimal, and only a very few ever saw military action. For the first time, the medieval castle in England is seen in a new light which will attract the general reader of history and archaeology as much as the specialist in economic and social history.
Unpaid Annotation
This book examines the role of the castle in the Norman Conquest of England and in the subsequent administration of the country. For the first time the castle is seen primarily as an instrument of peaceful administration, rather than as a military stronghold.
Table of Contents
Preface
The First Century of English Feudalism
Castles of the Conquest
The castle in politics and war
A pattern of castles
The Thirteenth Century
The royal castle and public administration
The castle in peace and war
The baronial castle
The frontier regions of medieval England
Castle and community
Castle and church
The Castle in the Later Middle Ages
The changing role of the castle
Tower-house, pele and bastle
Conclusion
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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