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Double-edged diplomacy : international bargaining and domestic politics /
edited by Peter B. Evans, Harold K. Jacobson, Robert D. Putnam.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1993.
description
xv, 490 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520076826 (pbk. : alk. paper) 0520076818 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1993.
isbn
0520076826 (pbk. : alk. paper) 0520076818 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
235294
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"These essays are not only individually first-rate, but the collection as a whole is unified and coherent. It moves the arguments about the interrelationships between domestic politics and foreign policy several steps forward."--Robert Jervis, Columbia University "Shows how an integrative analysis of domestic and international politics can aid understanding of many bilateral negotiations. This suggestive volume is likely to affect research on international negotiations for years to come."--Robert O. Keohane, Harvard University "Through a diverse set of case studies,Double-Edged Diplomacysuccessfully explores the 'two-level games' hypothesis in international negotiations and clearly shows that many international agreements can be understood only in terms of the interaction between domestic politics and international concerns. The net result is an important challenge for international relations theory to reformulate itself by incorporating the rich descrption of international agreements developed in this volume."--Duncan Snidal, University of Chicago
Flap Copy
"These essays are not only individually first-rate, but the collection as a whole is unified and coherent. It moves the arguments about the interrelationships between domestic politics and foreign policy several steps forward."--Robert Jervis, Columbia University "Shows how an integrative analysis of domestic and international politics can aid understanding of many bilateral negotiations. This suggestive volume is likely to affect research on international negotiations for years to come."--Robert O. Keohane, Harvard University "Through a diverse set of case studies, Double-Edged Diplomacy successfully explores the 'two-level games' hypothesis in international negotiations and clearly shows that many international agreements can be understood only in terms of the interaction between domestic politics and international concerns. The net result is an important challenge for international relations theory to reformulate itself by incorporating the rich descrption of international agreements developed in this volume."--Duncan Snidal, University of Chicago
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1994-03:
Evans et al. have edited a richly detailed investigation of the nature of international negotiations. They and their authors present case studies which help us to understand the two-level games which balance domestic and external interests. The authors pay particular attention to how well-intentioned international bargaining strategies can be sabotaged by the failure to adequately appreciate domestic concerns. The case studies include discussions of the Middle East negotiations, Cold War era debates over Germany, the US-Japan semiconductor and construction talks, human rights concerns in Argentina and Guatemala, and negotiations between international financial institutions and developing countries. An exploration of why the US and Panama could reach agreement on their differences, but the US and Nicaragua could not, is particularly insightful. The authors and editors of each case study return to the volume's central themes and, where possible, provide realistic public policy suggestions. Furthermore, all of the chapters try to demonstrate how domestic and international interests can be integrated or reconciled. Edited volumes are often collections of mixed quality. This book is of a uniformly high standard however, and well worth the reader's effort. Graduate; faculty. J. Lemco; Johns Hopkins University
Summaries
Long Description
This original look at the dynamics of international relations untangles the vigorous interaction of domestic and international politics on subjects as diverse as nuclear disarmament, human rights, and trade. An eminent group of political scientists demonstrates how international bargaining that reflects domestic political agendas can be undone when it ignores the influence of domestic constituencies. The eleven studies inDouble-Edged Diplomacyprovide a major step in furthering a more complete understanding of how politicsbetweennations affects politicswithinnations and vice versa. The result is a striking new paradigm for comprehending world events at a time when the global and the domestic are becoming ever more linked.
Main Description
This original look at the dynamics of international relations untangles the vigorous interaction of domestic and international politics on subjects as diverse as nuclear disarmament, human rights, and trade. An eminent group of political scientists demonstrates how international bargaining that reflects domestic political agendas can be undone when it ignores the influence of domestic constituencies. The eleven studies in "Double-Edged Diplomacy" provide a major step in furthering a more complete understanding of how politics "between" nations affects politics "within" nations and vice versa. The result is a striking new paradigm for comprehending world events at a time when the global and the domestic are becoming ever more linked.
Main Description
This original look at the dynamics of international relations untangles the vigorous interaction of domestic and international politics on subjects as diverse as nuclear disarmament, human rights, and trade. An eminent group of political scientists demonstrates how international bargaining that reflects domestic political agendas can be undone when it ignores the influence of domestic constituencies. The eleven studies in Double-Edged Diplomacy provide a major step in furthering a more complete understanding of how politics between nations affects politics within nations and vice versa. The result is a striking new paradigm for comprehending world events at a time when the global and the domestic are becoming ever more linked.
Table of Contents
Preface
Abbreviations
Introduction: Integrating International and Domestic Theories of International Bargainingp. 3
Dual Track and Double Trouble: The Two-Level Politics of INFp. 45
The Political Economy of Security Agreements: The Linked Costs of Failure at Camp Davidp. 77
East-West Bargaining Over Germany: The Search for Synergy in a Two-Level Gamep. 104
Armaments Among Allies: European Weapons Collaboration, 1975-1985p. 128
The 1933 World Economic Conference as an Instance of Failed International Cooperationp. 171
The Interaction of Domestic and International Politics: The Anglo-American Oil Negotiations and the International Civil Aviation Negotiations, 1943-1947p. 207
International Threats and Internal Politics: Brazil, the European Community, and the United States, 1985-1987p. 233
U.S.-Japan Negotiations on Construction and Semiconductors, 1985-1988: Building Friction and Relation-Chipsp. 265
The United States and Central America: Interlocking Debatesp. 303
U.S. Policy and Human Rights in Argentina and Guatemala, 1973-1980p. 330
Bargaining with the IMF: Two-Level Strategies and Developing Countriesp. 363
Building an Integrative Approach to International and Domestic Politics: Reflections and Projectionsp. 397
Appendix: Diplomacy and Domestic Politics: The Logic of Two-Level Gamesp. 431
Contributorsp. 469
Indexp. 471
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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