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Psychology, education, gods, and humanity /
Laurence Simon.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 1998.
description
xi, 217 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0275960587 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 1998.
isbn
0275960587 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
2337337
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [207]-214) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Laurence Simon is Professor of Psychology at Kingsborough Community College at the City University of New York
Summaries
Long Description
Based on the author's experience, this discussion of psychology as a human science (rather than a natural science) outlines classroom techniques integrating narrative psychology and dynamic interpersonal psychotherapy as a means of teaching and demonstrating the core curriculum. The core theory integrates modern evolutionary psychology, cognitive constructivism--especially as represented by the works of Jean Piaget and Robert Kegan--social constructionism, and socially-oriented interpersonal psychoanalysis. The sections on teaching techniques blend the above into a theory of student-teacher interactions with Lev Vygotsky's theory of education as an interpersonal process. The book is developed in four parts. Part I is a single chapter that discusses the inadequacy of the lecture method to teach courses in psychology; Part II, comprising of three chapters, lays the philosophical foundations of a postmodern view of psychology as a human science concerned with the phenomenological understanding of the development of human conscious experience and the adaptive process. Part III details the processes of cognitive, affective, and phenomenological change as developing individuals adapt to the physical, political, social, and cultural worlds that enfold around them. Part IV critiques traditional forms of education and describes a more individualized and humanized approach to teaching with its reliance on the student's written narratives. The final chapter is comprised entirely of fragments of student narratives that demonstrate the exciting outcomes of teaching human psychology in a humanistic fashion.
Long Description
Based on the author's experience, this discussion of psychology as a human science (rather than a natural science) outlines classroom techniques integrating narrative psychology and dynamic interpersonal psychotherapy as a means of teaching and demonstrating the core curriculum. The core theory integrates modern evolutionary psychology, cognitive constructivismespecially as represented by the works of Jean Piaget and Robert Kegansocial constructionism, and socially-oriented interpersonal psychoanalysis. The sections on teaching techniques blend the above into a theory of student-teacher interactions with Lev Vygotsky's theory of education as an interpersonal process. The book is developed in four parts. Part I is a single chapter that discusses the inadequacy of the lecture method to teach courses in psychology; Part II, comprising of three chapters, lays the philosophical foundations of a postmodern view of psychology as a human science concerned with the phenomenological understanding of the development of human conscious experience and the adaptive process. Part III details the processes of cognitive, affective, and phenomenological change as developing individuals adapt to the physical, political, social, and cultural worlds that enfold around them. Part IV critiques traditional forms of education and describes a more individualized and humanized approach to teaching with its reliance on the student's written narratives. The final chapter is comprised entirely of fragments of student narratives that demonstrate the exciting outcomes of teaching human psychology in a humanistic fashion.
Unpaid Annotation
Based on the author's experience, this discussion of psychology as a human science (rather than a natural science) outlines classroom techniques integrating narrative psychology and dynamic interpersonal psychotherapy as a means of teaching and demonstrating the core curriculum. The core theory integrates modern evolutionary psychology, cognitive constructivism--especially as represented by the works of Jean Piaget and Robert Kegan--social constructionism, and socially-oriented interpersonal psychoanalysis. The sections on teaching techniques blend the above into a theory of student-teacher interactions with Lev Vygotsky's theory of education as an interpersonal process.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. ix
Defining an Educational Problemp. 1
Discoveries and Inventionsp. 3
Stories and Lessons from Philosophyp. 19
Goals and Definitionsp. 21
The Morality of Gods and Human Beingsp. 35
Psychology, Biology, and Sociologyp. 53
Stories and Lessons from Psychologyp. 69
Toward a Theory of Human Adaptationp. 71
Adaptation and the Dynamics of Changep. 89
Individual Differences in Selvesp. 109
The Politics of Experience and the Social Construction of Selvesp. 129
Stories and Lessons from Educationp. 149
Changing Stories and New Lessonsp. 151
Changing Stories and New Lessons, Part IIp. 171
Stories Told and Lessons Learned: The Voices of My Studentsp. 191
Referencesp. 207
Indexp. 215
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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