Catalogue


New and improved : the transformation of American women's emotional culture /
John C. Spurlock and Cynthia A. Magistro.
imprint
New York : New York University Press, c1998.
description
xiii, 213 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0814780458 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : New York University Press, c1998.
isbn
0814780458 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
2337062
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 171-206) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-03-01:
In this well-written, entertaining, and soundly scholarly book, Spurlock and Magistro trace the changes of the 1920s and '30s that moved middle-class American women from Victorian ideas about separate spheres and controlled emotions to the modern era of companionate marriage, "good sex, and consumer delights." The historical eye that Spurlock brings to the task nicely complements the insights of Magistro the psychologist, as they examine the changing emotional lives of the 39 women whose diaries, letters, and memoirs they analyze. The authors astutely supplement these anecdotal materials with contemporary sociological studies, discuss the popular culture of consumerism, movies, and advice books, and expertly weave their conclusions into the ever-growing body of historical literature on women, men, family, courtship, marriage, and child-rearing in the 20th century. Organizing their analysis around the stages of life from youth to maturity, Spurlock and Magistro find that the shift to companionate marriage was more traumatic for women. Men still defined themselves through their work; women sacrificed the female networks of their mothers' generation as they turned exclusively to their husbands for their self-identity. Upper-division undergraduates and above. C. M. McGovern; Frostburg State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"The most comprehensive book ever to appear on unemployment in the United States." - George Gilder, author of Wealth and Poverty
"Vedder and Gallaway show convincingly that we need once again to rethink our entire notion of unemployment." - Jonathan R. T. Hughes, Northwestern University
"A triple hit: an engaging narrative of a century of U.S. economic history . . . an attack on the mythology that high wage rates and government spending reduce unemployment and a critique on wrong-headed public policies since 1930 that have raised unemployment levels." - Anna J. Schwartz, National Bureau of Economic Research
"...[a] compelling book that is extremely relevant to our own times."
"...[a] compelling book that is extremely relevant to our own times." - The Journal of American History , June 2002
"...[a] compelling book that is extremely relevant to our own times." -The Journal of American History, June 2002
"A book of great interest." - Kenneth Boulding
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 1999
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Redefining the way we think about unemployment in America today, Out of Work offers devastating evidence that the major cause of high unemployment in the United States is the government itself. An Independent Institute Book
Main Description
As the Victorian era drew to a close, American culture experienced a vast transformation. In many ways, the culture changed even more rapidly and profoundly for women. The "new woman," the "new freedom," and the "sexual revolution" all referred to women moving out of the Victorian home and into the public realm that men had long claimed as their own.Modern middle-class women made a distinction between emotional styles that they considered Victorian and those they considered modern. They expected fulfillment in marriage, companionship, and career, and actively sought up-to-date versions of love and happiness, relieved that they lived in an age free from taboo and prudery.Drawing on the diaries, letters, and memoirs of women from a wide range of backgrounds and geographic regions, this volume offers insights into middle-class women's experiences of American culture in this age of transition. It documents the ways in which that culture--including new technologies, advertising, and movies--shaped women's emotional lives and how these women appropriated the new messages and ideals. In addition, the authors describe the difficulties that women encountered when emotional experiences failed to match cultural expectations.
Main Description
...a compelling book that is extremely relevant to our times.-- The Journal of American History, June 2002As the Victorian era drew to a close, American culture experienced a vast transformation. In many ways, the culture changed even more rapidly and profoundly for women. The new woman, the new freedom, and the sexual revolution all referred to women moving out of the Victorian home and into the public realm that men had long claimed as their own.Modern middle-class women made a distinction between emotional styles that they considered Victorian and those they considered modern. They expected fulfillment in marriage, companionship, and career, and actively sought up-to-date versions of love and happiness, relieved that they lived in an age free from taboo and prudery.Drawing on the diaries, letters, and memoirs of women from a wide range of backgrounds and geographic regions, this volume offers insights into middle-class women's experiences of American culture in this age of transition. It documents the ways in which that culture--including new technologies, advertising, and movies--shaped women's emotional lives and how these women appropriated the new messages and ideals. In addition, the authors describe the difficulties that women encountered when emotional experiences failed to match cultural expectations.
Main Description
As the Victorian era drew to a close, American culture experienced a vast transformation. In many ways, the culture changed even more rapidly and profoundly for women. The "new woman," the "new freedom," and the "sexual revolution" all referred to women moving out of the Victorian home and into the public realm that men had long claimed as their own. Modern middle-class women made a distinction between emotional styles that they considered Victorian and those they considered modern. They expected fulfillment in marriage, companionship, and career, and actively sought up-to-date versions of love and happiness, relieved that they lived in an age free from taboo and prudery. Drawing on the diaries, letters, and memoirs of women from a wide range of backgrounds and geographic regions, this volume offers insights into middle-class women's experiences of American culture in this age of transition. It documents the ways in which that culture--including new technologies, advertising, and movies--shaped women's emotional lives and how these women appropriated the new messages and ideals. In addition, the authors describe the difficulties that women encountered when emotional experiences failed to match cultural expectations.
Main Description
"...a compelling book that is extremely relevant to our times." --The Journal of American History, June 2002 As the Victorian era drew to a close, American culture experienced a vast transformation. In many ways, the culture changed even more rapidly and profoundly for women. The "new woman," the "new freedom," and the "sexual revolution" all referred to women moving out of the Victorian home and into the public realm that men had long claimed as their own.Modern middle-class women made a distinction between emotional styles that they considered Victorian and those they considered modern. They expected fulfillment in marriage, companionship, and career, and actively sought up-to-date versions of love and happiness, relieved that they lived in an age free from taboo and prudery.Drawing on the diaries, letters, and memoirs of women from a wide range of backgrounds and geographic regions, this volume offers insights into middle-class women's experiences of American culture in this age of transition. It documents the ways in which that culture--including new technologies, advertising, and movies--shaped women's emotional lives and how these women appropriated the new messages and ideals. In addition, the authors describe the difficulties that women encountered when emotional experiences failed to match cultural expectations.
Table of Contents
Preface
Self and Emotion in the Early Twentieth Centuryp. 1
Flaming Youthp. 17
The Single Womanp. 53
The Flapper Wifep. 87
The Silver Cordp. 117
The Fountainp. 151
Notesp. 171
Indexp. 207
About the Authorsp. 213
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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