Catalogue


Profiles in diversity : women in the new South Africa /
Patricia W. Romero.
imprint
East Lansing, Mich : Michigan State University Press, c1998.
description
x, 231 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0870134477 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
East Lansing, Mich : Michigan State University Press, c1998.
isbn
0870134477 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
2336584
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 225-226) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-12:
Joining the array of life histories and collected interviews already published, this book offers 27 more vignettes of South African women's lives. Included are brief glimpses into the lives of Caucasian, African, mixed-race, and Indian women. The logic behind the book's organization is unclear; Afrikaner women are treated first, followed by those of mixed-race, then Jewish, African, English-speaking white, and Indian women. Although Caucasian women are divided into Afrikaner, Jewish, and English-speaking categories, with a section devoted to each, African women of many ethnic groups are clumped together in a single section. Despite the title's reference to "the New South Africa," most of the material refers to the apartheid era. Some of the material is quite interesting, but the work lacks depth and states the obvious--South Africa is "diverse." Numerous misspelled place names, personal names, and factual errors further mar the book. Lower-division undergraduates. E. S. Schmidt; Loyola College in Maryland
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 1998
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
A revealing oral history collection, Profiles in Diversity contains in-depth interviews of twenty-six women in South Africa from different racial, class, and age backgrounds. Conducted in Johannesburg, Pretoria, Bloemfontein, Vryburg, Cape Town, Port Elizabeth, Grahamstown, Durban, and a rural section of Kwa-Zulu Natal, these life histories encompass diverse experiences ranging from a squatter in a township outside Cape Town to an ANC activist in Port Elizabeth, who lost three sons to the struggle for democracy and who herself was imprisoned several times during what many in South Africa now refer to as the "civil war".Nearly all of these women describe their formative years spent growing up in South Africa's segregated society. Three young black students discuss the hardships they experienced in an unequal educational system as well as aspects of segregation in their childhood. They are joined in their memories and hopes for the future by two mature women -- one now a high court judge in Durban and the other a linguist at the University of South Africa in Pretoria -- both of whom studied at Harvard in the United States. Nancy Charton, the first woman ordained as an Anglican priest in South Africa, speaks about her past and what led her, in her early seventies, to a vocation in the church.Three Afrikaner women, including one in her late twenties, speak about growing up in South Africa and articulate their concerns for a future that, in some respects, differs from the predictions of their English-speaking or black sisters. Two now-deceased members of the South African Communist Party provide disparate accounts of what led them to lives of active opposition to the discriminationthat marked the lives of people of color, long before apartheid became embedded in South Africa's legal system. Also included is an account by Dr. Goonam, an Indian woman who grew up in relative comfort in the then province of
Main Description
A revealing oral history collection, Profiles in Diversitycontains in-depth interviews of twenty-six women in South Africa from different racial, class, and age backgrounds. Conducted in Johannesburg, Pretoria, Bloemfontein, Vryburg, Cape Town, Port Elizabeth, Grahamstown, Durban, and a rural section of Kwa-Zulu Natal, these life histories encompass diverse experiences ranging from a squatter in a township outside Cape Town to an ANC activist in Port Elizabeth, who lost three sons to the struggle for democracy and who herself was imprisoned several times during what many in South Africa now refer to as the "civil war." Nearly all of these women describe their formative years spent growing up in South Africa's segregated society. Three young black students discuss the hardships they experienced in an unequal educational system as well as aspects of segregation in their childhood. They are joined in their memories and hopes for the future by two mature women -- one now a high court judge in Durban and the other a linguist at the University of South Africa in Pretoria -- both of whom studied at Harvard in the United States. Nancy Charton, the first woman ordained as an Anglican priest in South Africa, speaks about her past and what led her, in her early seventies, to a vocation in the church. Three Afrikaner women, including one in her late twenties, speak about growing up in South Africa and articulate their concerns for a future that, in some respects, differs from the predictions of their English-speaking or black sisters. Two now- deceased members of the South African Communist Party provide disparate accounts of what led them to lives of active opposition to the discrimination that marked the lives of people of color, long before apartheid became embedded in South Africa's legal system. Also included is an account by Dr. Goonam, an Indian woman who grew up in relative comfort in the then province of Natal, while Ray Alexander discusses how she witnessed the tyranny visited on the Jews of her native Latvia before immigrating to the Cape.

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