Catalogue


Elections and voters in post-communist Russia /
edited by Matthew Wyman, Stephen White, Sarah Oates.
imprint
Cheltenham ; Northhampton, Mass. : Edward Elgar Pub., 1998.
description
xvi, 283 p.
ISBN
1858987431
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cheltenham ; Northhampton, Mass. : Edward Elgar Pub., 1998.
isbn
1858987431
catalogue key
2332019
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Ralph S. Clem (PhD, Columbia University) is Professor of International Relations at Florida International University, Miami Timothy J. Colton is Morris and Anna Feldberg Professor of Government and Russian Studies and Director of the Davis Center for Russian Studies at Harvard University Peter R. Craumer is Associate Professor of Geography in the Department of International Relations at Florida International University in Miami Evelyn Davidheiser received her PhD from Duke University and is the Assistant Director of the Institute of International Studies at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis Geoffrey Evans is a Fellow of Nuffield College, Oxford Vicki L. Hesli is Associate Professor at the University of Iowa Jerry F. Hough is James B. Duke Professor of Political Science, Duke University, and Senior Fellow of the Brookings Institution Susan Goodrich Lehmann is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Columbia University, New York Ian McAllister is Director of the Research School of Social Sciences at The Australian National University, Canberra Arthur H. Miller (PhD, University of Michigan, 1971), is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Iowa Social Science Institute at The University of Iowa Sarah Oates, a lecturer in the Politics Department at the University of Glasgow William M. Reisinger is Professor of Political Science at the University of Iowa Leonid Sedov is a chief analyst for the All-Russia Centre for the Study of Public Opinion in Moscow Stephen White is Professor of Politics and a member of the Institute of Russian and East European Studies at the University of Glasgow Stephen Whitefield is Fellow in Politics at Pembroke College in Oxford Matthew Wyman is Lecturer in Politics at Keele University
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-07-01:
Drawing together some of the leading researchers in the field and using survey research, this volume represents a strong contribution to the literature on elections and voting in post-communist Russia. Among the questions considered are the basis on which Russians decide to vote (or not to vote), the demographics of voter choice, explanations for variations in regional voter turnout, the basis of electoral partisanship, the distribution of the Russian electorate on key political dimensions, the applicability of the left-right continuum in the Russian case, explanations for the appearance of a sizable antireform element among Yeltsin voters in the 1996 presidential election, and explanations for the Communist Party's defeat in those same elections. The introductory chapter provides an excellent overview of the volume's purpose and each of the subsequent chapters. Most of the individual contributions are explicitly theoretical, deriving testable hypotheses from the available theoretical literature in order to solve the particular puzzle of the chapter. Students of Russian public opinion and electoral behavior will find this book must reading. Particularly suitable for graduate students, researchers, and specialists. T. D. Clark Creighton University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 1999
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Written in a clear, accessible style, this book links developments in Russia to general themes in political science, and especially to other post-communist countries. It will be of interest for anyone working in transition studies.
Main Description
This book offers conclusive evidence that scholars working on post-communist Russia have mastered the techniques and theories of voting behaviour as a strategy for explaining Russian electoral politics. The book also demonstrates that these theories and techniques, if applied with nuance by those familiar with the case, can help us understand contemporary Russia. The authors in this volume include many of the best scholars working on this subject . . . The methods deployed cover the gamut, from regression analysis of socioeconomic and regional variables deployed by Clem and Craumer, to the statistical expression of survey data deployed by almost everyone else. The volume is packed with numbers: 23 figures and 54 tables! It is hard to think of a useful correlation that has not been explored in this volume. This is a splendid book, must reading for anyone interested in post-communist elections or comparative electoral analysis more generally. Michael McFaul, Slavic Review Students of Russian public opinion and electoral behavior will find this book must reading. Particularly suitable for graduate students, researchers, and specialists. T.D. Clark, Choice Throughout the formerly communist world a single party monopoly has been replaced by multi-party politics and competitive elections. Drawing on the most recent work of the leading specialists in modern Russian politics, this path-breaking volume marks a decisive advance in our understanding of the relationships between voters, political parties and the conduct of the government in what is still the world s largest country. Issues addressed include: the effects of the electoral system and of electoral campaigns regional dimensions of party support parties in the state Duma and the uncertain evolution of a post-communist party system the turnout of voters for elections leader popularity and party development ideological divisions and party-building the divisions between the left and right Written in a clear, accessible style, this book links developments in Russia to general themes in political science, and especially to other post-communist countries. It will be welcomed by scholars and students of the development and transformation of post-communist politics, and by a wider readership in comparative politics.
Unpaid Annotation
'This book offers conclusive evidence that scholars working on post-communist Russia have mastered the techniques and theories of voting behaviour as a strategy for explaining Russian electoral politics. The book also demonstrates that these theories and techniques, if applied with nuance by those familiar with the case, can help us understand contemporary Russia. The authors in this volume include many of the best scholars working on this subject ...The methods deployed cover the gamut, from regression analysis of socioeconomic and regional variables deployed by Clem and Craumer, to the statistical expression of survey data deployed by almost everyone else. The volume is packed with numbers: 23 figures and 54 tables! It is hard to think of a useful correlation that has not been explored in this volume. This is a splendid book, must reading for anyone interested in post-communist elections or comparative electoral analysis more generally.' - Michael McFaul, Slavic Review 'Students of Russian public opinion and electoral behavior will find this book must reading. Particularly suitable for graduate students, researchers, and specialists.' - T.D. Clark, Choice Throughout the formerly communist world a single party monopoly has been replaced by multi-party politics and competitive elections. Drawing on the most recent work of the leading specialists in modern Russian politics, this path-breaking volume marks a decisive advance in our understanding of the relationships between voters, political parties and the conduct of the government in what is still the world's largest country. Issues addressed include: the effects of the electoral system and of electoral campaigns regional dimension of party support parties in the state Duma and the uncertain evolution of a post-communist party system the turnout of voters for elections leader popularity and party development ideological divisions and party-building the divisions between the left and right Written in a clear, accessible style, this book links developments in Russia to general themes in political science, and especially to other post-communist countries. It will be welcomed by scholars and students of the development and transformation of post-communist politics, and by a wider readership in comparative politics.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. vii
List of Tablesp. ix
List of Contributorsp. xiii
Elections and Voters in the New Russiap. 1
To Vote or Not to Vote: Election Turnout in Post-communist Russiap. 15
Regional Patterns of Voter Turnout in Russian Elections, 1993-96p. 40
The Emerging Structure of Partisan Divisions in Russian Politicsp. 68
Leader Popularity and Party Development in Post-Soviet Russiap. 100
Ideological Divisions and Party-building Prospects in Post-Soviet Russiap. 136
Ideology and Russian Mass Politics: Uses of the Left-Right Continuump. 167
The Mystery of Opponents of Economic Reform among the Yeltsin Votersp. 190
Consistency and Change among Russian Votersp. 228
The CPRF: Towards Social Democracy or National Socialism?p. 240
Appendices
Russian Election Results, 1993-96p. 275
Contents of Companion Volumep. 280
Subject indexp. 283
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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