Catalogue


European women and the second British Empire /
Margaret Strobel.
imprint
Bloomington : Indiana University Press, c1991.
description
xiii, 108 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0253206316 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Bloomington : Indiana University Press, c1991.
isbn
0253206316 (pbk. : alk. paper)
general note
"A Midland Book, MB 631." -- back cover.
catalogue key
2322998
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [77]-105) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1991-11:
Strobel's brief and mildly polemical book is an essay on the actions of (mainly) British women and their role in imperialism. Strobel shows them as explorers, wives of colonial officials, prostitutes, nurses, teachers, and missionaries. For these women the empire offered opportunities not available at home and for some, a chance to improve the lives of subject people (with mixed results). Limited as women were by sex roles and cultural patterns set by male domination, their efforts often tightened the grip of colonial control. The book aims to combat the " One myth of which Strobel disposes, in part, is the notion (even expressed by some modern scholars) that women were harmful to empire. As the argument went, married women distracted their husbands from imperial duties; they replaced indigenous mistresses from whom administrators had learned much about colonial society. Women in large numbers also made possible the creation of a more exclusive British group, distant from colonial subjects; and women's presence supposedly fueled the sexual appetites of indigenous men. The very complexity of empire makes any generalizations suspect, and Strobel's book is most useful in raising questions that would be better answered in more specialized works. Strobel recognizes this, but feels that a critical overview is now called for. The documentation is full. College and university libraries. P. T. Smith Saint Joseph's University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 1991
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
"It enhances our understanding of intracultural and cross-cultural relationships and raises significant questions about the complexities of the colonial phenomenon in the modern era." -Journal of World History
Main Description
"It enhances our understanding of intracultural and cross-cultural relationships and raises significant questions about the complexities of the colonial phenomenon in the modern era." -- Journal of World History "Provides a powerful and important analysis foregrounding the ideological construction of whiteness in understandings of gender and sexuality.... Margaret Strobel manages to provide a convincing analysis of the contradictory and often challenging space occupied by European women in the project of empire." -- Signs "Strobel is to be highly commended for an historical analysis that brings critical light to bear on the complex interactions of gender, race, and class that have shadowed both European men's and women's participation in colonialism." -- Women and Politics "... a clear exposition and synthesis... In this useful introduction to a new field, Strobel lays out clearly the arguments on which it is built. Her book makes it possible to acquaint students with the initial array of scholarship that is already growing. She also demonstrates that rewriting an imperial history that is sensitive to gender, culture, race, sexuality, and power is an exhilarating enterprise." -- American Historical Review Based on the published accounts of travelers and officials' wives, biographies and other materials, this is a lively, fast-paced account of the roles of white women in the British empire, from about 1880 to the recent past. The European women of the second British empire carved out a space for themselves amid the options made available to them by British expansion, but they too were treated as inferiors -- the inferior sex within the superior race.
Main Description
"It enhances our understanding of intracultural and cross-cultural relationships and raises significant questions about the complexities of the colonial phenomenon in the modern era." -- Journal of World History"Provides a powerful and important analysis foregrounding the ideological construction of whiteness in understandings of gender and sexuality.... Margaret Strobel manages to provide a convincing analysis of the contradictory and often challenging space occupied by European women in the project of empire."  -- Signs"Strobel is to be highly commended for an historical analysis that brings critical light to bear on the complex interactions of gender, race, and class that have shadowed both European men's and women's participation in colonialism." -- Women and Politics"... a clear exposition and synthesis... In this useful introduction to a new field, Strobel lays out clearly the arguments on which it is built. Her book makes it possible to acquaint students with the initial array of scholarship that is already growing. She also demonstrates that rewriting an imperial history that is sensitive to gender, culture, race, sexuality, and power is an exhilarating enterprise." -- American Historical ReviewBased on the published accounts of travelers and officials' wives, biographies and other materials, this is a lively, fast-paced account of the roles of white women in the British empire, from about 1880 to the recent past. The European women of the second British empire carved out a space for themselves amid the options made available to them by British expansion, but they too were treated as inferiors -- the inferior sex within the superior race.
Main Description
"It enhances our understanding of intracultural and cross-cultural relationships and raises significant questions about the complexities of the colonial phenomenon in the modern era." Journal of World History "Provides a powerful and important analysis foregrounding the ideological construction of whiteness in understandings of gender and sexuality.... Margaret Strobel manages to provide a convincing analysis of the contradictory and often challenging space occupied by European women in the project of empire."Signs "Strobel is to be highly commended for an historical analysis that brings critical light to bear on the complex interactions of gender, race, and class that have shadowed both European men's and women's participation in colonialism." Women and Politics "... a clear exposition and synthesis... In this useful introduction to a new field, Strobel lays out clearly the arguments on which it is built. Her book makes it possible to acquaint students with the initial array of scholarship that is already growing. She also demonstrates that rewriting an imperial history that is sensitive to gender, culture, race, sexuality, and power is an exhilarating enterprise." American Historical Review Based on the published accounts of travelers and officials' wives, biographies and other materials, this is a lively, fast-paced account of the roles of white women in the British empire, from about 1880 to the recent past. The European women of the second British empire carved out a space for themselves amid the options made available to them by British expansion, but they too were treated as inferiorsthe inferior sex within the superior race.
Table of Contents
Preface
Introduction
Sexuality and Society: The Myth of the Destructive Female
Home and Work
Information and Policy Mediators: Travelers, Writers, Scholars, and Administrators
Missionaries, Reformers, and the Status of Indigenous Women
Conclusion
Notes
References Cited
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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