Catalogue


Politics, diplomacy, and the media : Gorbachev's legacy in the West /
Anthony R. DeLuca.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 1998.
description
x, 165 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0275959686 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 1998.
isbn
0275959686 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
2304020
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [155]-158) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Anthony R. Deluca is Professor of History at Emerson College
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-02:
Before his ousting Gorbachev was portrayed by Moscow-based American journalists as a heroic reformer who was successfully transforming the Soviet system. DeLuca (history, Emerson College) endlessly quotes these mistaken and superficial journalistic accounts and uncritically portrays Gorbachev as indeed a heroic reformer, one who was especially good with the media. DeLuca writes almost as if he were unaware of the outcome of Gorbachev's delayed and halfway tinkering. As was true of Gorbachev and his journalistic worshipers, DeLuca pays little attention to the accelerating decay of the Soviet economy and the angry rising of the non-Russian nationalities, and far too much attention to Gorbachev as glittering personality: "It ain't the dude; it's the system." Based almost entirely on outdated books by journalists, DeLuca cites few works by Russians and no Russian-language sources. The best scholarship on Gorbachev is probably Archie Brown's The Gorbachev Factor (CH, Sept.'97), which delivers expert insight backed by superb Russian sources for half the price. General readers. M. G. Roskin; Lycoming College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Lively and thoughtfully considered--this is a book that reminds us of the tasks that Gorbachev faced as party leader, and of the skills of communication with which he tried to resolve them, and why this still matters to the West." - Stephen Leonard White, Professor of Politics University of Glasgow
"Professor DeLuca provides a masterful overview of Mikhail Gorbachev and his era. Absorbingly written, the book explores Gorbachev's intentions, strategies, successes, and failures. The author depicts Gorbachev as the Soviet Union's first western-style media savvy politician who believed that the force of his will, the passion of his rhetoric, and his skill at manipulating the press could transform the USSR from an obsolescent, dispirited, grey dictatorship into the vibrant, prosperous, socialist utopia for which the revolutionaries of 1917 had hoped. Gorbachev emerges from these pages as...the brilliant statesman who almost single-handedly ended the Cold War, and he is the bumbling economic planner who, in going too far and not far enough, left his country in economic ruin. This is a fascinating tale and DeLuca tells it well." - Teddy J. Uldricks, Professor of History University of North Carolina at Asheville
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 1999
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text studies Mikhail Gorbachev: the impact he had on politics, his emphasis on the spoken word and visual image, his dependancy on the media to promote his political programme, and his ultimate downfall.
Long Description
Mikhail Gorbachev was a major force at the center of political change in the latter half of the 20th century. His emphasis on the spoken word and the visual image was so pronounced that the character of the reform program he introduced became both a reflection and an extension of his own political persona. To promote his political program, Gorbachev depended upon the media to assist him in delivering his message and restructuring the Soviet experience; it was almost as if he believed that he could talk a revolution into existence. He hoped to promote both real and symbolic change, but found instead that such efforts led to his own downfall. Gorbachev's case is an example of the power of personality in transforming a political culture. The author organizes his material into three topic areas: perestroika, glasnost, and "New Thinking" in foreign policy; and, in each of these areas he highlights Gorbachev's relations with the media, his public image, and the political influence of the media. Gorbachev's "New Thinking" influenced Soviet foreign policy and set in motion a change in the international environment, as he preached disarmament and international understanding as opposed to military confrontation and nuclear conflict. The net result, however, was the loss of the Soviet Empire in Eastern Europe and the end of the Soviet Union's superpower status.
Long Description
Mikhail Gorbachev was a major force at the center of political change in the latter half of the 20th century. His emphasis on the spoken word and the visual image was so pronounced that the character of the reform program he introduced became both a reflection and an extension of his own political persona. To promote his political program, Gorbachev depended upon the media to assist him in delivering his message and restructuring the Soviet experience; it was almost as if he believed that he could talk a revolution into existence. He hoped to promote both real and symbolic change, but found instead that such efforts led to his own downfall. Gorbachev's case is an example of the power of personality in transforming a political culture. The author organizes his material into three topic areas: perestroika, glasnost, and New Thinking in foreign policy; and, in each of these areas he highlights Gorbachev's relations with the media, his public image, and the political influence of the media. Gorbachev's New Thinking influenced Soviet foreign policy and set in motion a change in the international environment, as he preached disarmament and international understanding as opposed to military confrontation and nuclear conflict. The net result, however, was the loss of the Soviet Empire in Eastern Europe and the end of the Soviet Union's superpower status.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Personality, Charisma, and Leadershipp. 1
The Making of an International Personap. 1
Youth, Politics, and Stylep. 5
Leadership and Ideological Reformp. 13
Perestroika and the Revival of Soviet Politicsp. 23
Perestroika as Political, Social, and Economic Reformp. 23
Stalinism and the Andreyeva Letterp. 31
Sakharov and the Congress of People's Deputiesp. 36
Yeltsin and the Russian Alternativep. 41
Glasnost: The Media and the Formation of a New Political Culturep. 53
Glasnost in Theory and Practicep. 53
News Media: Print and Broadcast Journalismp. 59
The Emergence of a New Popular Culturep. 65
Foreign Policy: Gorbachev Stylep. 83
New Thinkingp. 83
Summitry and Internationalismp. 96
The Peace and Disarmament Offensivep. 105
Into the Abyss and Beyondp. 123
The Great Master of Improvisationp. 123
The August Coupp. 133
Resignation, Controversy, and Assessmentp. 139
Selected Bibliographyp. 155
Indexp. 159
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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