Catalogue


Emerging democracies in East Central Europe and the Balkans /
Attila Ágh.
imprint
Northampton, MA : Edward Elgar, 1998.
description
viii, 359 p.
ISBN
1858988179
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Northampton, MA : Edward Elgar, 1998.
isbn
1858988179
catalogue key
2294000
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Attila Agh is Professor and Head of the Political Science Department at the Budapest University of Economics, Hungary and Director of the Hungarian Centre for Democracy Studies, Hungary.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-09:
Hungarian political scientist Agh provides an overview of the transition to democracy in East Europe. He introduces some concepts from the literature on democratization elsewhere in the world and then devotes a chapter to each of 12 countries, summarizing the key features of the political system 1989-97. Each chapter includes a chronology and key election results. focuses on national democratic political institutions--parliaments and presidents. Further explanation of the policy disputes underlying the emergence of rival parties would have been helpful. Covering all 12 countries of the region from Poland to Macedonia is a strength but also a weakness, since it leaves limited space for each case. Everyone teaching about this complex and diverse region faces this difficult trade-off. The writing is clear and concise. The succinct analytical focus suggests this book is derived from well-honed classroom lectures. As such, it would be ideal as a textbook for undergraduate courses, particularly if it became available in a more affordable paperback edition. Its nearest rival is probably Keith Crawford's East Central European Politics Today (CH, Jun 97), which takes a thematic rather than country-by-country approach. The volume will also be useful for libraries as a reference work on the political history of the region. P. Rutland; Wesleyan University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 1999
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This book offers an analytical comparison of the democratization process in 12 countries of East Central Europe and the Balkans. It characterizes the types of democratization which have occurred against the political history of the country.
Main Description
Agh combines area studies and comparative politics, so frequently divided after the collapse of communism, in a harmonious way . . . The value of this volume compared to so many collections of papers by various authors lies in the systematic uniformity with which the material on various countries is presented . . . The book will prove to be extremely useful as a textbook in comparative politics and East European studies. Klaus von Beyme, Slavic Review . . . the book is informative and easy to read. It also includes a number of useful tables of election outcomes, and basic data on the countries covered. Adrian Hyde-Price, International Affairs It is a sturdy work, of real value to the traveller who makes a political voyage through today s East central Europe. Frederick Quinn, Ethnic Research Digest This book offers a comprehensive analytical comparison of the democratization process in twelve countries of East Central Europe and the Balkans. It characterizes the types of democratization which have occurred in the region from 1989 until the end of 1997 and sets these recent changes within the framework of the political history of the countries. Emerging Democracies in East Central Europe and the Balkans takes a unique look at the democratization process using evidence which is not readily available in the existing literature. It examines less well-known countries including Albania and Macedonia, and more complex countries such as Serbia. Atilla Ágh analyses the political, parliamentary and party developments from a comparative perspective both within the countries themselves and within the region as a whole. Considering all countries within the same theoretical framework, he also examines the long-term historical dimension and legacies of political culture. In addition, he analyses the goals of achieving Euro-Atlantic integration and the preparation of full membership to NATO and the European Union. Finally, he compares these new democracies with developments in Southern Europe and Latin America. This book will be welcomed by scholars and students of comparative politics and politics of emerging democracies as well as government officials and policymakers.
Unpaid Annotation
'Agh combines area studies and comparative politics, so frequently divided after the collapse of communism, in a harmonious way ...The value of this volume - compared to so many collections of papers by various authors - lies in the systematic uniformity with which the material on various countries is presented ...The book will prove to be extremely useful as a textbook in comparative politics and East European studies.' - Klaus von Beyme, Slavic Review '...the book is informative and easy to read. It also includes a number of useful tables of election outcomes, and basic data on the countries covered.' - Adrian Hyde-Price, International Affairs 'It is a sturdy work, of real value to the traveller who makes a political voyage through today's East central Europe.' - Frederick Quinn, Ethnic Research Digest This book offers a comprehensive analytical comparison of the democratization process in twelve countries of East Central Europe and the Balkans. It characterizes the types of democratization which have occurred in the region from 1989 until the end of 1997 and sets these recent changes within the framework of the political history of the countries. Emerging Democracies in East Central Europe and the Balkans takes a unique look at the democratization process using evidence which is not readily available in the existing literature. It examines less well-known countries including Albania and Macedonia, and more complex countries such as Serbia. Atilla Ágh analyses the political, parliamentary and party developments from a comparative perspective both within the countries themselves and within the region as a whole. Considering all countries within the same theoretical framework, he also examines the long-term historical dimension and legacies of political culture. In addition, he analyses the goals of achieving Euro-Atlantic integration and the preparation of full membership to NATO and the European Union. Finally, he compares these new democracies with developments in Southern Europe and Latin America. This book will be welcomed by scholars and students of comparative politics and politics of emerging democracies as well as government officials and policymakers.
Table of Contents
List of Tablesp. vii
Introduction
Democratization in a Regional Approachp. 3
East Central European Countries in Re-Democratization
The Early Comer: Polandp. 27
The Long Transition: Hungaryp. 73
The Velvet Transformation: Czech and Slovak Republicsp. 113
The Balkan Countries in Democratization
The Disintegration of Yugoslaviap. 165
National Integration in the Yugoslav Successor Statesp. 189
The Forerunner in the Balkans: Bulgariap. 233
The Legacy of the Authoritarian Past: Romaniap. 257
The Latecomer in the Balkans: Albaniap. 285
Conclusion
The Europeanization of the East Central European and Balkan Regionsp. 303
Bibliographyp. 317
Indexp. 333
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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