Catalogue


Puzzles for the will : fatalism, Newcomb and Samarra, determinism and omniscience /
Jordan Howard Sobel.
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c1998.
description
xiii, 212 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0802043267 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
More Details
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c1998.
isbn
0802043267 :
catalogue key
2290827
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Description for Reader
Issues of free will and determinism, with their far-reaching practical implications, hold a central place in the history of philosophy. In this book Jordan Howard Sobel looks at the many and varied approaches to this complex topic.The arguments analysed fall into two main groups: those from within the literature of fatalism or logical determinism, claiming that free will is impossible, and those from the field of causal determinism, granting that free will is logically possible but showing that we lack free will owing to certain contingent facts about the world. Sobel considers some problems for decision-making that arise if we grant the possibility that someone may be able to predict reliably what another agent will freely choose. Sobel's careful analysis lays a solid foundation for the study of free will and will interest all who are concerned with fated, determined, and predicted choices and how philosophical reflection about these can puzzle the will.
Unpaid Annotation
Issues of free will and determinism, with their far-reaching practical implications, hold a central place in the history of philosophy. In this book Jordan Howard Sobel looks at the many anti varied approaches to this complex problem.The arguments analyzed fall into two main group: those from within the literature of fatalism or logical determinism, claiming that free will is impossible, and those from the field of causal determinism, granting that free will is logically possible but showing that we lack free will due to certain contingent facts about the world. In addition, Sobel considers some problems for decision-making that arise if we grant the possibility that someone may be able to predict reliably what another agent will choose freely. Sobel's careful analysis lays a solid foundation for the development of his ideas and arguments. His book will be cited in philosophy classrooms for years to come.
Description for Reader
Issues of free will and determinism, with their far-reaching practical implications, hold a central place in the history of philosophy. In this book Jordan Howard Sobel looks at the many and varied approaches to this complex topic. The arguments analysed fall into two main groups: those from within the literature of fatalism or logical determinism, claiming that free will is impossible, and those from the field of causal determinism, granting that free will is logically possible but showing that we lack free will owing to certain contingent facts about the world. Sobel considers some problems for decision-making that arise if we grant the possibility that someone may be able to predict reliably what another agent will freely choose. Sobel's careful analysis lays a solid foundation for the study of free will and will interest all who are concerned with fated, determined, and predicted choices and how philosophical reflection about these can puzzle the will.
Table of Contents
Preface
Logical Fatalismsp. 3
Predicted Choicesp. 51
Free Will and Varieties of Determinismp. 77
Newcomb Denuo, Omniscience, and 'Choiceless Freedom'p. 167
Looking Backp. 201
Referencesp. 203
Indexp. 209
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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