Catalogue


The origins and demise of South African apartheid : a public choice analysis /
Anton D. Lowenberg and William H. Kaempfer.
imprint
Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, c1998.
description
284 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0472109057 (cloth : acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, c1998.
isbn
0472109057 (cloth : acid-free paper)
catalogue key
2267580
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 261-278) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-05-15:
Lowenberg and Kaempfer employ public choice analysis tools to explain apartheid and the role of economic sanctions in its collapse. Public choice focuses attention on economic variables, especially interest group activities, to explain policy decisions. Thus, the rise and fall of apartheid is related to configurations of economic interests in two periods of South African history. From the 1920s to the 1950s apartheid was shaped by dominant white miners and farmers at a time when the industrial sector was all but absent. By the 1980s the South African economy had fundamentally changed, and the costs to dominant economic of maintaining apartheid groups exceeded its benefits. In calculating these costs, the authors also analyze the role of external sanctions, noting that sanctions usually reflect interest group pressures in the country imposing them. Given this origin, the authors conclusion is not surprising: external sanctions had relatively little impact on policy making in South Africa, though the sanctions imposed by the international banking system were damaging and increased the cost of apartheid to South Africa. In sum, the authors present forceful arguments that apartheid's rise and fall reflected the interests of dominant groups within South Africa. Of great interest to students of African politics and international political economy. Upper-division undergraduates and above. L. P. Frank; St. Xavier University
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Choice, May 1999
Choice, June 1999
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
What motivated South Africa's former white leaders to hand over the reins of power to a black government? Economist Anton D. Lowenberg examines the economic interests that led to apartheid and the economic prospects for post-apartheid South African society.
Main Description
In the early 1990s, South Africa experienced a remarkable transition to democracy. Nelson Mandela was freed from prison, his previously outlawed ANC was legalized, and all-race elections were held in 1994. What motivated South Africa's former white leaders to hand over the reins of power to a black government? And what are the prospects for economic and political freedom in post-apartheid South Africa? The Origins and Demise of South African Apartheidaddresses these questions, using public choice models to distill the essence of apartheid, to examine the reasons for its emergence in the first instance, and to study its subsequent evolution as the economy's structure changed. The authors evaluate the role of foreign economic sanctions and other international pressures in precipitating the fall of apartheid but find that domestic economic problems, caused by apartheid policies themselves, were more important than foreign sanctions in crippling the South African economy. Further perpetuation of apartheid would have meant even further declines in living standards for white as well as black South Africans. The authors also examine the postapartheid constitution for clues on South Africa's future prosperity. Finally they identify procedural and substantive weaknesses in the constitution that need to be addressed in order to create the foundations for a truly free society. The book will appeal to a wide audience of economists and political scientists, especially those interested in public choice and comparative systems, as well as to South Africa scholars in the fields of political science, history, and economics. Anton D. Lowenberg is Professor of Economics, California State University, Northridge. William H. Kaempfer is Professor of Economics, University of Colorado, Boulder.
Main Description
In the early 1990s, South Africa experienced a remarkable transition to democracy. Nelson Mandela was freed from prison, his previously outlawed ANC was legalized, and all-race elections were held in 1994. What motivated South Africa's former white leaders to hand over the reins of power to a black government? And what are the prospects for economic and political freedom in post-apartheid South Africa? The Origins and Demise of South African Apartheid addresses these questions, using public choice models to distill the essence of apartheid, to examine the reasons for its emergence in the first instance, and to study its subsequent evolution as the economy's structure changed. The authors evaluate the role of foreign economic sanctions and other international pressures in precipitating the fall of apartheid but find that domestic economic problems, caused by apartheid policies themselves, were more important than foreign sanctions in crippling the South African economy. Further perpetuation of apartheid would have meant even further declines in living standards for white as well as black South Africans. The authors also examine the postapartheid constitution for clues on South Africa's future prosperity. Finally they identify procedural and substantive weaknesses in the constitution that need to be addressed in order to create the foundations for a truly free society. The book will appeal to a wide audience of economists and political scientists, especially those interested in public choice and comparative systems, as well as to South Africa scholars in the fields of political science, history, and economics. Anton D. Lowenberg is Professor of Economics, California State University, Northridge. William H. Kaempfer is Professor of Economics, University of Colorado, Boulder.
Table of Contents
List of Figures
List of Tables
Introductionp. 1
The Political Economy of Apartheid
The Method of Public Choicep. 17
The Political Economy of Classical Apartheidp. 31
Race Discrimination, Segregation, and Local Public Goodsp. 53
The Demise of Apartheid: External and Internal Causes
A Public Choice Model of International Economic Sanctionsp. 79
Trade Sanctions against South Africa: The Politics behind the Policiesp. 107
The Disinvestment Campaign of the 1980sp. 120
The Oil Embargop. 141
Sanctions and Anti-apartheid Politics in South Africap. 164
Why the Apartheid Economy Failedp. 194
The Constitution of Post-apartheid South Africa
A Normative Theory of Constitution Formation and Maintenancep. 229
The Prospects for Post-apartheid South Africap. 249
References
Index
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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