Catalogue


Global competition in capital goods : an American perspective /
Robert S. Eckley.
imprint
New York : Quorum Books, 1991.
description
xiii, 180 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0899305598 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Quorum Books, 1991.
isbn
0899305598 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
2229109
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [161]-165) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1991-12:
Eckley (president emeritus, Illinois Wesleyan University) identifies and evaluates trends in the erosion of the competitive position of the US capital goods industry vis-`a-vis the world market. The author's basic analytical tool consists of in-depth analyses of 7 leading US firms. These analyses are supplemented by detailed observations on 50 of the 7 firms' leading competitors, as well as by monitoring the activities of another 50 firms influencing capital goods industry behavior. The resulting work is a timely and thought-provoking examination of this important segment of US industry, accounting for about one quarter of total manufacturing activity and some one third of total exports. Eckley concludes with specific and pertinent recommendations for restoring the US competitive position. Because most of the author's analysis is based on secondary sources, much of the material included has already appeared in print. However, his clean, crisp style and his ability to identify basic issues make this a book worth reading. Recommended collateral reading: Working Papers, MIT Commission on Industrial Productivity (2 v., 1989); Robert H. Hayes, Steven C. Wheelwright, and Kim B. Clark, Dynamic Manufacturing (CH, Feb'89), and Kenichi Ohmae, The Borderless World (Feb'91). Academic and public library collections.-W. C. Struning, Seton Hall University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œEckley identifies and evaluates trends in the erosion of the competitive position of the US capital goods industry vis-a-vis the world market. The author's basic analytical tool consists of in-depth analyses of 7 leading US firms. These analyses are supplemented by detailed observations on 50 of the 7 firms' leading competitors, as well as by monitoring the activities of another 50 firms influencing capital goods industry behavior. The resulting work is a timely and thought-provoking examination of this important segment of US industry, accounting for about one quarter of total manufacturing activity and some one third of total exports. Eckley concludes with specific and pertinent recommendations for restoring the US competitive position. Because most of the author's analysis is based on secondary sources, much of the material included has already appeared in print. However, his clean, crisp style and his ability to identify basic issues make this a book worth reading. Recommended collateral reading: Working Papers, MIT Commission on Industrial Productivity (2 v., 1989); Robert H. Hayes, Steven C. Wheelwright, and Kim B. Clark, Dynamic Manufacturing, and Kenichi Ohmae, The Borderless World. Academic and public library collections.'' Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 1991
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Summaries
Long Description
The capital goods industries--machinery, electrical and electronic equipment, transport equipment (except automobiles), and instruments and related equipment--provide more than one-third of total U.S. exports. But in the past twenty years, these industries have displayed a continual weakening of their competitive position. In this study, Robert Eckley investigates this leading sector of the American economy and its competition for global markets by concentrating on case studies of seven companies that represent the principal segments of the capital goods industries. The approach that Eckley takes is an empirical one, utilizing the experience of IBM, Boeing, General Electric, Eastman Kodak, Caterpillar, Cummins, and Cincinnati Milacron to illustrate the developments that have occurred in this sector of the world economy. The companies are all leaders within their industries, and also offer a representative variety of the products, processes, and labor organizations found in the capital goods industries. Following a detailed introduction, Eckley devotes one chapter to each of the seven companies, seeking out commonalities within the larger capital goods sector and drawing conclusions about costs, markets, and organizational and managerial practices. A concluding chapter focuses on the keys to regaining American leadership: increasing capital investment, remedying educational deficiencies, and improving business decisions. Marketing and planning executives in international business will find this work to be an invaluable resource, as will students in business and public policy courses.
Unpaid Annotation
This study investigates the capital goods industries, which account for more than one-third of U.S. exports. Eckley offers case studies of seven companies--IBM, Boeing, General Electric, Eastman Kodak, Caterpillar, Cummins, and Cincinnati Milacron--that offer a representative variety of the products, processes, and labor organizations found in the capital goods industries. Commonalities within the larger capital goods sector are discussed, and conclusions are drawn about costs, markets, and organizational and managerial practices. Means for regaining competitive advantage through capital investment, education, and better decision making are also addressed.
Table of Contents
Capital Goods: America's Leading Sector
Computers and Chips: IBM Attempts to Improve Its Responses
Governments and Consortia: Boeing's Competition Electrical Equipment
GE Keeps Only the Winners Kodak's Lethargic
Reaction to Competition in Photographic Equipment and Supplies Caterpillar's Ordeal
Foreign Exposure Brings Near Catastrophe Cummins
An Independent Tries to Stay on Top Cincinnati Milacron
How the U.S. Lost Machine Tool Leadership Can American Competitive
Superiority Be Regained?
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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