Catalogue

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Ethiopia : power and protest : peasant revolts in the twentieth century /
Gebru Tareke.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1991.
description
xxi, 272 p. : maps ; 24 cm. --
ISBN
0521400112
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1991.
isbn
0521400112
catalogue key
2226427
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 229-260) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1992-07:
The premise of Tareke's book is that Ethiopian history traditionally has been the story of powerful elites and that the mass of ordinary peasants have been conspicuously left out. He maintains that his book, which highlights the story of three uprisings in northern, central, and southeastern Ethiopia, fills the gap in Ethiopian historiography. But Tareke falls into the same trap as some social historians who merely add a subtle social twist to political history. In the three cases discussed Tigrai, Gojjam, and Bale the revolts and protests were basically reactions to government policies and were often instigated by vocal elites. Tareke draws extensively on the theoretical underpinning of agrarian economy and rural sociology, and demonstrates how the literature and Ethiopian oral tradition confirm the similarity of experiences among rural folk. Three chapters describe the revolts that occurred in Ethiopia between 1942 and 1970. The Tigrai revolt (or the Weyane rebellion) had its genesis in the confused power play between rebels and local nobility on the one hand, and the conflict between British designs and Ethiopian objectives on the other. Although it had substantial popular support, the Weyane rebellion was not a spontaneous massive movement. The same thing can be said about the other two uprisings in Gojjam and Bale. The book cannot be characterized as social history but it is nonetheless well written, with new and important information about these uprisings. It is also well documented with maps and extensive cross-references. Highly recommended for research libraries.-W. M. Akalou, Texas Southern University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 1992
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This study of popular protest and resistance in Ethiopia focuses on three important peasant-based rebellions that occurred between 1941 and 1970. Gebru Tareke argues that these rebellions were connect to the rise of a modern, bureaucratic, multi-ethnic national state instead of being a consequence of capitalist exploitation.
Description for Library
Power and Protest is an analysis of popular protest and resistance in Ethiopia. Covering the years 1941 to 1970, the book examines three important, but little known, revolts which were part of a broader social conflict resulting from the rise of a modern national state. Aside from providing a better understanding of the rebellions themselves, the author also offers an explanation for the eruption and intensification of armed conflict in rural Ethiopia after 1974.
Main Description
This study of popular protest and resistance in Ethiopia focuses on three important peasant-based rebellions that occurred between 1941 and 1970. The author attempts to uncover certain key features of popular protest in pre-revolutionary Ethiopia. Drawing upon ample evidence, he concludes that these revolts were not a consequence of capitalist exploitation, as was usually the case in most Third World countries, but were connected with the rise of a modern, bureaucratic, multi-ethnic national state. Ethiopian peasants were neither conservative nor compliant, as is often assumed, although their defiance was nevertheless essentially non-revolutionary. These interesting and fresh findings also suggest a possible explanation for the eruption and intensification of armed conflict in rural Ethiopia after 1974. On a theoretical level, the study makes a significant contribution to the ongoing analysis of social movements in agrarian societies.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Preface
List of maps
List of tables
Abbreviations
Introduction: an historical theoretical overview
Society And History
The historical context
The social context
Resistance And Repression
Weyane: provincialism vs. centralism
Bale: the nationalities armed
Gojjam: a vendTe revolt?
Conclusions
Epilogue
Notes
Bibliography
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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