Catalogue

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From ladies to women : the organized struggle for woman's rights in the Reconstruction Era /
Israel Kugler.
imprint
New York : Greenwood Press, 1987.
description
xiv, 221 p., [6] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm. --
ISBN
0313252394 (lib. bdg. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Greenwood Press, 1987.
isbn
0313252394 (lib. bdg. : alk. paper)
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
2223062
 
Bibliography: p. [207]-211.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1987-10:
Kugler traces the history of the American Equal Rights Association, which formed in 1866 under the leadership of four feminists-Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Lucy Stone, and Lucretia Mott. He documents their support for the inclusion of woman suffrage in the post-Civil War 15th amendment to the US Constitution. When the women were disappointed, they split in 1869 into two factions. The National Woman Suffrage Association, headed by Stanton and Anthony, focused its efforts on winning a suffrage amendment to the constitution and supported a broad range of women's issues, including marriage, divorce, love, and the organization of laboring women into unions. The American Woman Suffrage Association, led by Stone, preferred to work for suffrage legislation on the state level. Unlike its rival, AWSA permitted participation by men. All efforts to achieve compromise and unity, led by Mott and Theodore Tilton, were unsuccessful, and the two groups maintained a rivalry for 20 years. Covering some of the same ground as Ellen DuBois's Feminism and Suffrage: The Emergence of an Independent Woman's Movement in America, 1848-1869 (CH, Jan '79), Kugler nevertheless provides a clear and useful comparison between the goals, strategies, projects, and publications of the two opposing suffrage factions. Undergraduate libraries.-K.J. Blair, University of Washington
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œ...Kugler's book has its compelling points. His choice of lengthy quotations draws the reader into the mindset of the movement's leaders and critics. In general, Kugler grounds the women's movement persuasively within the broader reform ethos of the Reconstruction era. Despite its image in the press, the Reconstruction era women's rights movement was not a loose cannon. As described by Kugler, it was part and parcel of the larger world of reform, even though the attempts at coalition promised more than they delivered.'' Labor History
'œKugler traces the history of the American Equal Rights Association, which formed in 1866 under the leadership for four feminists--Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Lucy Stone, and Lucretia Mott. He documents their support for the inclusion of woman suffrage in the post-Civil War 15th amendment to the US Constitution. When the women were disappointed, they split in 1869 into two factions. The National Woman Suffrage Association, headed by Stanton and Anthony, focused its efforts to winning a suffrage amendment to the constitution and supported a broad range of women's issues, including marriage, divorce, love, and the organization of laboring women into unions. The American Woman Suffrage Association, lead by Stone, preferred to work for suffrage legislation on the state level. All efforts to achieve compromise and unity led by mott and Theodore Tilton, were unsuccessful, and the two groups maintained a rivalry for 20 years.... [Kugler] provides a clear and useful comparison between the goals, strategies, projects, and publications of the two opposing suffrage factions. Undergraduate libraries.'' Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 1987
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Summaries
Long Description
Unlike most leading works that focus on a broad spectrum of the woman's rights movement, Israel Kugler's volume provides an in-depth analysis of the drive for equalty for women during a specific, influential era in American history: the pioneering efforts of woman's rights organizations in the post-Civil War period. With the war against slavery at an end, the Reconstruction Era was hailed by women leaders, who had been active in the Union cause, as the time for the establishment of equal rights for all humanity--men and women alike. It was this historic period that saw the creation of permanent woman's rights organizations dedicated to a specific goal--that of woman suffrage.
Table of Contents
Preface
Acknowledgments
Setting the Stage
Through the Civil War Precursors Changes in Woman's Status
Reconstruction
The Dawn of a New Day? The Political and Economic Stakes in the War's Aftermath Toward Organizing
The Woman's Rights Convention of 1866
The Broadest Platform
The American Equal Rights Association
1866-1867 Fissures over Priorities
New York Constitutional Convention and the Kansas Suffrage Campaigns, 1867
The Struggle for Control, 1868
The Rivals
The National Woman Suffrage Association and the American Woman Suffrage Association Unity
The Attempt and Failure
1870 The Side Issues of Contention
Suffrage, Marriage, Divorce, and Sex Political Action Organized Labor and Woman's Rights
The Positive Phase The Labor-Woman's Rights Coalition Breaks Apart The Woman's Rights Press
Epiloque From the Suffrage Victory to the Future of Woman's Rights
Notes
Selected Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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