Catalogue


UnAfrican Americans : nineteenth-century black nationalists and the civilizing mission /
Tunde Adeleke.
imprint
Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, c1998.
description
xv, 192 p. : ports. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
081312056X (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, c1998.
isbn
081312056X (alk. paper)
catalogue key
2200837
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [166]-181) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-12:
Adeleke, born in Nigeria, offers an original analysis of the black American nationalist movement that took shape in the second half of the 19th century. This movement is usually seen as a radical rejection of Eurocentricism and white domination, a quest to build a place for marginalized African Americans through emigration to Africa. But Adeleke's study of Martin Delany, Alexander Crummell, and Henry McNeal Turner--pioneers who laid the intellectual foundation of black nationalism--finds that these men were decidedly Eurocentric themselves. They believed in the "civilizing mission" whereby primitive Africans would benefit from the modernization of European colonization. Adeleke illustrates the imperialistic character of black nationalism and the division between African Americans and Africans. His thesis is certain to stir controversy and cause a rethinking of the African diaspora. The work is well researched and clearly presented. A 16-page bibliography of primary and secondary sources, 13 pages of footnotes, and illustrations of the three leaders studied enhance the study. Highly recommended for libraries with strong collections in African American history or African history. Upper-division undergraduates and above. R. Detweiler; California Polytechnic State University--San Luis Obispo
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1998-05-26:
Passionate and well written, Adeleke's stunning reexamination of three 19th-century African Americans is bound to be controversial. But the truth must be told, and the Nigerian-born director of Africana studies at Loyola University is up to the task. It's hard to believe that this is Adeleke's first book: with fresh lucid prose and wry wit, he brings to light the historic ironies and philosophical hypocrisies that continue to shape African and African American lives. Martin Delany, Alexander Crummell and Henry McNeal Turner were three who lost faith with the struggle for freedom and franchise in this country and shifted toward what became a reactionary escapist plan to migrate. Africa was the goal, a place dictated by birthright for black Americans to rule and civilize. When wealthy blacks refused to finance the schemes, European and American governments and robber barons were courted. Delany, considered the father of black nationalism, accumulated data in Africa that facilitated British colonization. Crummell, enamored with European culture, used religious rhetoric to excuse slavery here and to revile African culture. Turner, a former reconstruction legislator, appealed to the U.S. government for $40 billion in reparations to finance the mass relocation. Adeleke builds a solid case to support his charge that the so-called pan-Africanism of these men was actually a very destructive narrow nationalism. Their contempt for African people and their indigenous cultures led to support of imperialist intervention at a time when nation-states were forming. Opportunistically, the men abandoned the call when political tides turned for blacks in the U.S., but the colonial wheel has already been set in motion. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An important and pioneering book that will change the way American historians think about nineteenth-century black nationalism.... One of the most powerful rethinkings of black American nationalism that has been written in the past thirty years." -- Clarence Walker
"An important and pioneering book that will change the way American historians think about nineteenth-century black nationalism.... One of the most powerful rethinkings of black American nationalism that has been written in the past thirty years.-- Clarence Walker" -- Clarence Walker
"An interesting treatment of black nationalism in the U.S." -- Booklist
"An interesting treatment of black nationalism in the U.S.-- Booklist" -- Booklist
"He argues 19th century African Americans were no different than Euro-Americans: They wanted to colonize Africa and to establish a black homeland, but if established, this homeland would be based upon European, not African, civilization." -- The Griot
"He argues 19th century African Americans were no different than Euro-Americans: They wanted to colonize Africa and to establish a black homeland, but if established, this homeland would be based upon European, not African, civilization.-- The Griot" -- The Griot
"His thesis is certain to stir controvery and cause a rethinking of the African diaspora." -- Choice
"His thesis is certain to stir controvery and cause a rethinking of the African diaspora.-- Choice" -- Choice
"In this fine exploration of the 'double consciousness' of the 'golden age' of black American nationalism, historian Tunde Adeleke makes an important contribution to the project to correct the monolithic perception of black nationalism as a counter culture movement fundamentally opposed to racial oppression." -- Journal of Intercultural Studies
"In this fine exploration of the 'double consciousness' of the 'golden age' of black American nationalism, historian Tunde Adeleke makes an important contribution to the project to correct the monolithic perception of black nationalism as a counter culture movement fundamentally opposed to racial oppression.-- Journal of Intercultural Studies" -- Journal of Intercultural Studies
"Lays bare, in provocative ways, some of the more troubling aspects of nineteenth-century black nationalism." -- Journal of American History
"Lays bare, in provocative ways, some of the more troubling aspects of nineteenth-century black nationalism.-- Journal of American History" -- Journal of American History
"Passionate and well written, Adeleke's stunning reexamination of three 19th-century African Americans is bound to be controversial. With fresh lucid prose and wry wit, he brings to light the historic ironies and philosophical hypocrisies that continue to shape African and African American lives." -- Publishers Weekly
"Passionate and well written, Adeleke's stunning reexamination of three 19th-century African Americans is bound to be controversial. With fresh lucid prose and wry wit, he brings to light the historic ironies and philosophical hypocrisies that continue to shape African and African American lives.-- Publishers Weekly" -- Publishers Weekly
"The strength of UnAfrican Americans is its author's frank presentation of the anti-African, or civilizationalist, face of its subjects.-- H-NET Book Review" -- H-NET Book Review
"The strength of UnAfrican Americans is its author's frank presentation of the anti-African, or civilizationalist, face of its subjects." -- H-NET Book Review
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, May 1998
Booklist, June 1998
Choice, December 1998
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Nigerian-born scholar Tunde Adeleke argues that 19th-century black American nationalism not only embodied the racist and paternalistic values of Euro-American culture but also played an active role in justifying Europe's intrusion into Africa.
Main Description
" Though many scholars will acknowledge the Anglo-Saxon character of black American nationalism, few have dealt with the imperialistic ramifications of this connection. Now, Nigerian-born scholar Tunde Adeleke reexamines nineteenth-century black American nationalism, finding not only that it embodied the racist and paternalistic values of Euro-American culture but also that nationalism played an active role in justifying Europe's intrusion into Africa. Adeleke looks at the life and work of Martin Delany, Alexander Crummell, and Harry McNeal Turner, demonstrating that as supporters of the mission civilisatrice (""civilizing mission"") these men helped lay the foundation for the colonization of Africa. By exposing the imperialistic character of nineteenth-century black American nationalism, Adeleke reveals a deep historical and cultural divide between Africa and the black diaspora. Black American nationalists had a clear preference--Euro-America over Africa--and their plans were not designed for the immediate benefit of Africans but to enhance their own fortunes. Arguing that these men held a strong desire for cultural affinity with Europe, Adeleke makes a controversial addition to the ongoing debate concerning the roots of black nationalism and Pan-Africanism.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Preface
Introduction: Black American Nationalism: Definition, Background, Conceptsp. 1
The Cultural Context of Black Nationalism: Racist Ideology and the Civilizing Missionp. 13
The Historical Context of Black Nationalism: The Quest for American Nationalityp. 31
Martin Robison Delany: The Economic and Cultural Contexts of Imperialismp. 43
Alexander Crummell: Religious, Moral, and Cultural Legitimation of Imperialismp. 70
Henry McNeal Turner: The Cultural Imperative of Imperialismp. 92
Black American Nationalism and Africa: Ambivalence and Paradoxesp. 111
Notesp. 153
Bibliographyp. 166
Indexp. 183
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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