Catalogue


Merchants of Essaouira : urban society and imperialism in southwestern Morocco, 1844-1886 /
Daniel J. Schroeter.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1988.
description
xxi, 322 p. : ill., maps. --
ISBN
0521324556
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1988.
isbn
0521324556
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
2191583
 
Bibliography: p. 295-310.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1989-03:
Schroeter's work focuses on the leading merchant families of Essaouira, most of whom were Jewish, when that city was Morocco's largest seaport and principal entrepot for foreign trade. The author depicts not only the socioeconomic and cultural dynamics of the town in its heyday, but also the network of ties linking those families to the central government (Makhzen), the chiefs of Morocco's entire Southwest region, and the major European powers. This work sheds much light on Moroccan responses to European imperial pressures, and on developments that eventually led to French control over most of the kingdom. Massively researched and richly documented, Schroeter's study draws heavily on hitherto unused Moroccan tax records and family papers, as well as consular reports and archives in Britain, France, Israel, and the US. Detailed statistics and technical discussions of foreign trade, currency fluctuations, property values, and taxation policies suggest that the work will appeal more to specialists than to general readers. It is a worthy addition to earlier histories of Moroccan cities, such as Janet Abu-Lughod's Rabat, Urban Apartheid in Morocco (1980), and Kenneth L. Brown's People of Sale (CH, Feb '77). -G. B. Doxsee, Ohio University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 1989
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Essaouira was founded n 1764 by Sultan Sidi Muhammad b. Abdullah as his port for developing trade with Europe. This study of a specific city and region throws light on the problems of traditional societies in the age of European economic imperialism.
Main Description
Essaouira was founded n 1764 by Sultan Sidi Muhammad b. Abdullah as his port for developing trade with Europe. Through a group of Jewish middlemen, it served as a link between Europe, Morocco and su-Saharan Africa. In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries its fame rivalled Tripoli, Tunis and Algiers. Based on extensive untapped archive in Morocco, papers of Jewish merchant houses and consular records of Britain, France and the United States, this book gives an account of the city in its heyday. Essaouira was an opening to foreign penetration, but it was also important to the Moroccan government, because potentially dissident regions became tied to its commercial and political activities. The control of the sultans was undermined as foreign powers imposed liberal trade and intervened in Moroccan affairs. This study of a specific city and region throws light on the problems of traditional societies in the age of European economic imperialism.
Table of Contents
Introduction
The royal port
Merchants of the Sultan
Port and bazaar
Beyond the walls
The politics of trade
Foreign intervention and domestic reforms
The struggle for the Southwest
The people of Essaouira in pre-colonial times
The end of an era
Appendices
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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