Catalogue


Adviser, teacher, role model, friend : on being a mentor to students in science and engineering /
National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine.
imprint
Washington, D.C. : National Academy Press, 1997.
description
xi, 84 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0309063639
format(s)
Book
Holdings
A Look Inside
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This guide offers helpful advice on how teachers, administrators, and career advisers in science and engineering can become better mentors to their students. It starts with the premise that a successful mentor guides students in a variety of ways: by helping them get the most from their educational experience, by introducing them to and making them comfortable with a specific disciplinary culture, and by offering assistance with the search for suitable employment. Other topics covered in the guide include career planning, time management, writing development, and responsible scientific conduct. Also included is a valuable list of bibliographical and Internet resources on mentoring and related topics. Single copy, $19.95; 2-9 copies, $17.50 each; 10 or more copies, $16.95 (no other discounts apply)
Long Description
This guide offers helpful advice on how teachers, administrators, and career advisers in science and engineering can become better mentors to their students. It starts with the premise that a successful mentor guides students in a variety of ways: by helping them get the most from their educational experience, by introducing them to and making them comfortable with a specific disciplinary culture, and by offering assistance with the search for suitable employment. Other topics covered in the guide include career planning, time management, writing development, and responsible scientific conduct. Also included is a valuable list of bibliographical and Internet resources on mentoring and related topics.
Main Description
This guide offers helpful advice on how teachers, administrators, and career advisors in science and engineering can become better mentors to their students. It starts with the premise that a successful mentor helps students in a variety of ways: by helping them get the most from their educational experience, by introducing them to and making them comfortable with a specific disciplinary culture, and by offering assistance with the search for suitable employment. Other topics covered in the guide include career planning, time management and professional development, responsible scientific conduct, and writing. Also included is a valuable list of bibliographical and Internet resources on mentoring and related topics.
Table of Contents
What Is a Mentor?p. 1
The Mentoring Relationshipp. 3
Professional Ethicsp. 7
Population-Diversity Issuesp. 7
The Mentor As Faculty Adviserp. 17
Mentoring Undergraduatesp. 17
Mentoring Graduate Studentsp. 23
Mentoring Postdoctoral Studentsp. 36
Mentoring Junior Facultyp. 39
The Mentor As Career Adviserp. 43
Envisioning and Planning a Careerp. 44
Undergraduates: Early Perspectivesp. 46
Graduate Students: Helping Students Become Colleaguesp. 49
Postdoctoral Students: Finding a "Real" Jobp. 50
The Career as Continuump. 51
The Mentor As Skills Consultantp. 53
Developing Skills as an Undergraduatep. 53
Developing Skills as a Graduate Studentp. 54
Skills for All Levelsp. 56
The Mentor As Role Modelp. 61
Recommendation: Improving the Quality of Mentoringp. 65
Resourcesp. 69
Internet Resourcesp. 69
Gender, Cultural, and Disability Issuesp. 71
Bibliographyp. 72
List of Boxes
Tips
Advice for New Mentorsp. 8
Building Respectp. 18
Aptitudes and Goalsp. 44
Two Key Career Questions to Discuss with Studentsp. 45
Writing Letters of Recommendationp. 47
Building Trustp. 55
Styles
Good Mentoring: Seeking Helpp. 6
Poor Mentoring: Cultural Bias (1)p. 10
Poor Mentoring: Cultural Bias (2)p. 11
Poor Mentoring: Inappropriate Behaviorp. 12
Good Mentoring: Academic Warning Signsp. 20
Poor Mentoring: When Is a Risk Worth Taking?p. 22
Good Mentoring: Socializationp. 29
Good Mentoring: Being Flexiblep. 48
Poor Mentoring: Honest Advicep. 50
Good Mentoring: Breaking Through Red Tapep. 70
Facts
Why Be a Good Mentor?p. 3
Three Logistical Issues to Discuss with Doctoral and Postdoctoral Candidatesp. 30
A Resume or a CV?p. 37
Profiles
A Mathematics Major Who Became an Actuaryp. 25
A Nurse Who Became a Research Managerp. 57
A Geneticist-Molecular Biologist Who Became a Patent Lawyerp. 62
Summary Points
Chapter 1p. 15
Chapter 2p. 42
Chapter 3p. 52
Chapter 4p. 60
Chapter 5p. 63
Addendum
Report Brief: Reshaping the Graduate Education of Scientists and Engineersp. 79
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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