Catalogue


British and American naval power : politics and policy, 1900-1936 /
Phillips Payson O'Brien.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 1998.
description
x, 274 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0275958981 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 1998.
isbn
0275958981 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
2141586
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [257]-268) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-11:
O'Brien rejects the standard linking of the rise of the US Navy with a concurrent decline of Britain's Royal Navy. By examining the status of the two navies at the start of the 20th century, building programs, naval rivalry at Versailles, the Washington and Geneva arms limitations conferences, and the collapse of arms limitations--and the reaction of each nation to those events--the author paints a less lineal, far more complicated picture. Both nations' sense of security fluctuated across the era, leading to large swings in naval funding. Britain was concerned about US expansion under Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson, but the US Navy never threatened British interests. Britain's refusal to grant American parity in cruisers at the Geneva Conference in 1927 goaded the US into a building program, but Anglo-American amity returned at the London Conference in 1930. Drawing on personal papers and government records, O'Brien examines the beliefs and actions of government leaders and analyzes the process by which policy was made for each navy. The comparative focus makes this a valuable contribution to the historiography of both navies and to understanding defense policy during the first half of the 20th century. All levels. J. C. Bradford; Texas A&M University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œThis important new book revisits some of the best known areas of modern naval history, providing fresh and rewarding insights....[T]his is an impressive book that will reward all students of twentieth century naval power.'' The American Neptune
"This important new book revisits some of the best known areas of modern naval history, providing fresh and rewarding insights....[T]his is an impressive book that will reward all students of twentieth century naval power."- The American Neptune
'œO'Brien's rejection of rivalry over naval supremacy as the focal point of Anglo-US naval relations during the first half of the twentieth century is valid and a useful corrective to recent literature. His analysis of the shortcomings of Winston Churchill's naval chauvinism during the 1920s is persuasive.'' The International History Review
"O'Brien's rejection of rivalry over naval supremacy as the focal point of Anglo-US naval relations during the first half of the twentieth century is valid and a useful corrective to recent literature. His analysis of the shortcomings of Winston Churchill's naval chauvinism during the 1920s is persuasive."- The International History Review
'œ...O'Briens work is valuable on several counts. It succinctly adumbrates the differences between the two nations' political and popular perceptions of their respective navies and cogently summarizes Britain's streamlined and relatively efficient naval administration with the chaotic, factionalized, and uncoordinated U.S. Navy Department.'' The Historian
"...O'Briens work is valuable on several counts. It succinctly adumbrates the differences between the two nations' political and popular perceptions of their respective navies and cogently summarizes Britain's streamlined and relatively efficient naval administration with the chaotic, factionalized, and uncoordinated U.S. Navy Department."- The Historian
'œThe comparative focus makes this a valuable contribution to the historiography of both navies and to understanding defense policy during the first half of the 20th century.'' Choice
"The comparative focus makes this a valuable contribution to the historiography of both navies and to understanding defense policy during the first half of the 20th century."- Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 1998
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Summaries
Long Description
U.S. and British naval power developed in quite different ways in the early 20th century before the Second World War. This study compares, contrasts, and evaluates both British and American naval power as well as the politics that led to the development of each. Naval power was the single greatest manifestation of national power for both countries. Their armies were small and their air forces only existed for part of the period covered. For Great Britain, naval power was vital to her very existence, and for the U.S., naval power was far and away the most effective tool the country could use to exercise armed influence around the world. Therefore, the decisions made about the relative strengths of the two navies were in many ways the most important strategic choices the British and American governments ever made. An important book for military historians and those interested in the exercise and the extension of power.
Table of Contents
Abbreviations
Introduction
Before the War Naval Policy in Great Britain and the United States British Naval Power from the Two Power Standard to 1908
Theodore Roosevelt and American Naval Power
The 1909 Naval Estimates Crisis From Taft to Wilson
The Inter-War Years Anglo-American Rivalry and the Paris Peace Conference
The Washington Conference and the Question of Naval Parity
The Geneva Conference: A Crisis in Anglo-American Relations
The Highpoint and Collapse of the Naval Arms Control Process
Conclusion
Appendix 1
Appendix 2
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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