Catalogue


An odd attempt in a woman : the literary life of Frances Brooke /
Lorraine McMullen.
imprint
Vancouver : University of British Columbia Press, 1983.
description
xvii, 243 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0774801743 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Vancouver : University of British Columbia Press, 1983.
isbn
0774801743 :
general note
Includes bibliographical references p.[237]-238 and index.
catalogue key
2131426
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
A book full of character and colour which deserves to reach a larger audience, beyond the specialists in Canadian history or Victorian children's literature. - Joseph Miller, The Reader
This item was reviewed in:
Books in Canada, April 1984
Books in Canada, August 1984
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Aged 26 and newly married, Juliana Ewing left England in 1867, boundfor Fredericton, New Brunswick, where her husband had been posted tothe army garrison. A famed children's writer and skilful artist,Juliana used her talents in chronicling for her family in Yorkshire herday-to-day experiences in the maritime city from Confederation to thewithdrawal of British troops in 1869. In 101 letters, reproduced almost in their entirety, Julianarecreates the 'high colonial'society of mid-nineteenth-centuryFredericton. Her letters unconsciously also reveal herself -- hercourage, intelligence, gaity and, above all, her loving nature. Witty,perceptive, and dramatic, her letters reflect her ability as a prosewriter of unusual sensibility.
Main Description
Aged 26 and newly married, Juliana Ewing left England in 1867, bound for Fredericton, New Brunswick, where her husband had been posted to the army garrison. A famed children#146;s writer and skilful artist, Juliana used her talents in chronicling for her family in Yorkshire her day-to-day experiences in the maritime city from Confederation to the withdrawal of British troops in 1869. In 101 letters, reproduced almost in their entirety, Juliana recreates the #146;high colonial#146; society of mid-nineteenth-century Fredericton. Her letters unconsciously also reveal herself -- her courage, intelligence, gaity and, above all, her loving nature. Witty, perceptive, and dramatic, her letters reflect her ability as a prose writer of unusual sensibility.

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