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Zionism and the creation of a new society /
Ben Halpern & Jehuda Reinharz.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1998.
description
293 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0195092090 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
added author
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1998.
isbn
0195092090 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
2109483
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 273-279) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1998-12:
The late Halpern (emeritus, Near Eastern studies, Brandeis) wrote The Idea of the Jewish State in 1961. Coauthored by Reinharz (president and professor of modern Jewish history at Brandeis), the noted biographer of Zionist leader Chaim Weizmann, this continuation of Halpern's densely argued book addresses Zionist ideas and institutions through the prism of historical development, political thought, and the social makeup of pre-independence Israel. As the authors state in their introduction, "our examination comprehends the whole range of ideas and values attached to the Zionist enterprise in Palestine and the institutions built upon them." Presupposing a strong background knowledge, this rich book would be most useful in a research library or a library with strong holdings in political science and sociology. Public libraries may consider two of the standard introductions more accessible to the general reader: Walter Laquer's A History of Zionism (Schocken, 1989) and The Zionist Idea: A Historical Reader and Analysis (Greenwood, 1970). [Reinharz was a longtime LJ reviewer.‘Ed.]‘Paul M. Kaplan, Lake Villa Dist. Lib., IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 1998-11:
With this book Halpern and Reinharz make an important contribution to _understanding the making of Israeli society. Unlike other 19th-century nationalist movements, Zionism lacked a common oppressor. Jews living as a minority in a variety of European countries experienced different forms of persecution, which resulted in an array of strategies to meet the particular situation. Although Zionism was one response among many to the problem of antisemitism, within the movement itself it varied from country to country. These differences became more defined in Palestine, where numerous factions arose, with each insisting that its own ideological objectives were better suited to the realization of Zionist objectives. Similarly, because of the diverse nature of the immigrants who arrived in both prestate Palestine and in Israel after 1948, "established" institutions had to adjust to the immigrants as much as the immigrants had to adjust to the institutions of the Yishuv. The centrality of immigration to Israel as a primary tenet of Zionism, conclude the authors, has resulted in Israel's institutions and values remaining more in flux than fixed. The book is a companion to the late Ben Halpern's classic The Idea of the Jewish State (CH, Jan'70). Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. Fischel; Millersville University
Reviews
Review Quotes
In general, Halamish's argument is convincing, as it is backed up with a wealth of documentary and oral evidence. On the whole, the English translation suits the style and content of the Hebrew version: a plain unpretentious narrative free of academic jargon, with an occasional colloquialismto emphasize a particular point. Zionism,Israel,and the Middle East.
In general, Halamish's argument is convincing, as it is backed up with awealth of documentary and oral evidence. On the whole, the English translationsuits the style and content of the Hebrew version: a plain unpretentiousnarrative free of academic jargon, with an occasional colloquialism to emphasizea particular point. Zionism,Israel,and the Middle East.
"In general, Halsmish's argument is convincing as it is backed up with a wealth of documentary and oral evidence. On the whole, the English translation suits the style and content free of academic jargon, with an occasional colloquialism to emphasize a particular point."-- Zionism,Israel, and the Middle East "Authors bring unusual insight to the circumstances and concepts that made the Jewish state a possibility. Lucid, learned, and thoughtfully written, the book is a must for every student of Zionism and Israeli society."-- Shlomo Avineri, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem "The authors have provided an extraordinarily wide and rich historical analysis of Zionism from its inception to the creation of the State of Israel in 1948. Their control of both source material and secondary work is exhaustive and exact, and their interpretation of specific events always judicious and informed. One need not agree with them on all issues--as I do not--to recognize that this is a truly outstanding work."-- Steven T. Katz, Director of the Center for Judaic Studies at Boston University. "This is an excellent history of Zionist ideas and politics, mainly in Palestine, and of the early 'heroic' period leading to the establishment of the State of Israel. It was written by two leading students of the subject with admirable clarity and conciseness."-- Walter Laqueur, Institute for Strategic and International Studies, Washington, DC "This is a book about the power of faith, rather than faith in power. It reveals how the impossible became possible--and how a dream gave birth to a state. It is written in a real attempt to uphold intellectual integrity and adhere to factual chronology."--I Shimon Peres, former Prime Minister of Israel "This book reflects the combined work of two eminent historians, the late Ben Halpern and Jehuda Reinharz. A cross between historical and sociological approaches, this book manages admirably to present a dynamic picture of the Jewish society in Palestine and the Zionist movement in its most creative period--on the verge of statehood. Change and stability, revolution and tradition, ideologies and institutions: all are depicted here in their immense diversity as competing factors in Jewish life. This book is long overdue; I can hardly think of another book in the English language that so successfully presents the full spectrum of Zionist society in pre-state times. Combining a critical approach with a sympathetic view of Israel and Zionism, it avoids the pitfalls of eulogizing or excessive criticism, finding the right balance between the two. Any scholar or student of Israeli history would be wise to make use of this book."---- Anita Shapira, Tel Aviv University
"In general, Halsmish's argument is convincing as it is backed up with a wealth of documentary and oral evidence. On the whole, the English translation suits the style and content free of academic jargon, with an occasional colloquialism to emphasize a particular point."--Zionism,Israel, and theMiddle East "Authors bring unusual insight to the circumstances and concepts that made the Jewish state a possibility. Lucid, learned, and thoughtfully written, the book is a must for every student of Zionism and Israeli society."--Shlomo Avineri, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem "The authors have provided an extraordinarily wide and rich historical analysis of Zionism from its inception to the creation of the State of Israel in 1948. Their control of both source material and secondary work is exhaustive and exact, and their interpretation of specific events always judicious and informed. One need not agree with them on all issues--as I do not--to recognize that this is a truly outstanding work."--Steven T. Katz, Director of the Center for Judaic Studies at Boston University. "This is an excellent history of Zionist ideas and politics, mainly in Palestine, and of the early 'heroic' period leading to the establishment of the State of Israel. It was written by two leading students of the subject with admirable clarity and conciseness."--Walter Laqueur, Institute forStrategic and International Studies, Washington, DC "This is a book about the power of faith, rather than faith in power. It reveals how the impossible became possible--and how a dream gave birth to a state. It is written in a real attempt to uphold intellectual integrity and adhere to factual chronology."--I Shimon Peres, former Prime Minister of Israel "This book reflects the combined work of two eminent historians, the late Ben Halpern and Jehuda Reinharz. A cross between historical and sociological approaches, this book manages admirably to present a dynamic picture of the Jewish society in Palestine and the Zionist movement in its most creative period--on the verge of statehood. Change and stability, revolution and tradition, ideologies and institutions: all are depicted here in their immense diversity as competing factors in Jewish life. This book is long overdue; I can hardly think of another book in the English language that so successfully presents the full spectrum of Zionist society in pre-state times. Combining a critical approach with a sympathetic view of Israel and Zionism, it avoids the pitfalls of eulogizing or excessive criticism, finding the right balance between the two. Any scholar or student of Israeli history would be wise to make use of this book."----Anita Shapira, Tel Aviv University
'Specialists in Zionist history will recognize that this book is rigorously empirical, meticulous in gathering and presenting evidence ... an ambitious study .... [T]his book will surely serve as a landmark text inspiring further research and enlarging the intellectual legacy of Halpern,already well-known as one of Zionism's master theoreticians' -- Donna Robinson Divine, The International History Review
'Specialists in Zionist history will recognize that this book isrigorously empirical, meticulous in gathering and presenting evidence ... anambitious study .... [T]his book will surely serve as a landmark text inspiringfurther research and enlarging the intellectual legacy of Halpern, alreadywell-known as one of Zionism's master theoreticians' -- Donna Robinson Divine,The International History Review
"The authors have provided an extraordinarily wide and rich historical analysis of Zionism from its inception to the creation of the State of Israel in 1948. Their control of both source material and secondary work is exhaustive and exact, and their interpretation of specific events alwaysjudicious and informed. One need not agree with them on all issues--as I do not--to recognize that this is a truly outstanding work."--Steven T. Katz, Director of the Center for Judaic Studies at Boston University
"The authors have provided an extraordinarily wide and rich historicalanalysis of Zionism from its inception to the creation of the State of Israel in1948. Their control of both source material and secondary work is exhaustive andexact, and their interpretation of specific events always judicious andinformed. One need not agree with them on all issues--as I do not--to recognizethat this is a truly outstanding work."--Steven T. Katz, Director of the Centerfor Judaic Studies at Boston University
"This book reflects the combined work of two eminent historians, the late Ben Halpern and Jehuda Reinharz. A cross between historical and sociological approaches, this book manages admirably to present a dynamic picture of the Jewish society in Palestine and the Zionist movement in its mostcreative period--on the verge of statehood. Change and stability, revolution and tradition, ideologies and institutions: all are depicted here in their immense diversity as competing factors in Jewish life. This book is long overdue; I can hardly think of another book in the English language that sosuccessfully presents the full spectrum of Zionist society in pre-state times. Combining a critical approach with a sympathetic view of Israel and Zionism, it avoids the pitfalls of eulogizing or excessive criticism, finding the right balance between the two. Any scholar or student of Israelihistory would be wise to make use of this book."--Anita Shapira, Tel Aviv University
"This book reflects the combined work of two eminent historians, the lateBen Halpern and Jehuda Reinharz. A cross between historical and sociologicalapproaches, this book manages admirably to present a dynamic picture of theJewish society in Palestine and the Zionist movement in its most creativeperiod--on the verge of statehood. Change and stability, revolution andtradition, ideologies and institutions: all are depicted here in their immensediversity as competing factors in Jewish life. This book is long overdue; I canhardly think of another book in the English language that so successfullypresents the full spectrum of Zionist society in prestate times. Combining acritical approach with a sympathetic view of Israel and Zionism, it avoids thepitfalls of eulogizing or excessive criticism, finding the right balance betweenthe two. Any scholar or student of Israeli history would be wise to make use ofthis book."--Anita Shapira, Tel Aviv University
"This is a book about the power of faith, rather than faith in power. It reveals how the impossible became possible--and how a dream gave birth to a state. It is written in a real attempt to uphold intellectual integrity and adhere to factual chronology."--Shimon Peres, former Prime Ministerof Israel
"This is a book about the power of faith, rather than faith in power. Itreveals how the impossible became possible--and how a dream gave birth to astate. It is written in a real attempt to uphold intellectual integrity andadhere to factual chronology."--Shimon Peres, former Prime Minister ofIsrael
"This is an excellent history of Zionist ideas and politics, mainly inPalestine, and of the early 'heroic' period leading to the establishment of thestate of Israel. It was written by two leading students of the subject withadmirable clarity and conciseness."--Walter Laqueur, Institute for Strategic andInternational Studies, Washington, DC
"This is an excellent history of Zionist ideas and politics, mainly in Palestine, and of the early 'heroic' period leading to the establishment of the State of Israel. It was written by two leading students of the subject with admirable clarity and conciseness."--Walter Laqueur, Institute forStrategic and International Studies, Washington, DC
"This is a seminal work on the history of Zionism and the emergence of the State of Israel. It uniquely combines the history of ideas with social and political analyses. The authors bring unusual insight to the circumstances and concepts that made the Jewish state a possibility. Lucid,learned, and thoughtfully written, the book is a must for every student of Zionism and Israeli society."-- Shlomo Avineri, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
"This is a seminal work on the history of Zionism and the emergence of theState of Israel. It uniquely combines the history of ideas with social andpolitical analyses. The authors bring unusual insight to the circumstances andconcepts that made the Jewish state a possibility. Lucid, learned, andthoughtfully written, the book is a must for every student of Zionism andIsraeli society."--Shlomo Avineri, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
"This is a seminal work on the history of Zionism and the emergence of the State of Israel. It uniquely combines the history of ideas with social and political analyses. The authors bring unusual insight to the circumstances and concepts that made the Jewish state a possibility. Lucid, learned, and thoughtfully written, the book is a must for every student of Zionism and Israeli society."-- Shlomo Avineri, The Hebrew University of JerusalemIn general, Halamish's argument is convincing, as it is backed up with a wealth of documentary and oral evidence. On the whole, the English translation suits the style and content of the Hebrew version: a plain unpretentious narrative free of academic jargon, with an occasional colloquialism to emphasize a particular point. Zionism,Israel,and the Middle East."The authors have provided an extraordinarily wide and rich historical analysis of Zionism from its inception to the creation of the State of Israel in 1948. Their control of both source material and secondary work is exhaustive and exact, and their interpretation of specific events always judicious and informed. One need not agree with them on all issues--as I do not--to recognize that this is a truly outstanding work."--Steven T. Katz, Director of the Centerfor Judaic Studies at Boston University"This is an excellent history of Zionist ideas and politics, mainly in Palestine, and of the early 'heroic' period leading to the establishment of the State of Israel. It was written by two leading students of the subject with admirable clarity and conciseness."--Walter Laqueur, Institute for Strategic and International Studies, Washington, DC"This is a book about the power of faith, rather than faith in power. It reveals how the impossible became possible--and how a dream gave birth to a state. It is written in a real attempt to uphold intellectual integrity and adhere to factual chronology."--Shimon Peres, former Prime Minister of Israel"This book reflects the combined work of two eminent historians, the late Ben Halpern and Jehuda Reinharz. A cross between historical and sociological approaches, this book manages admirably to present a dynamic picture of the Jewish society in Palestine and the Zionist movement in its most creative period--on the verge of statehood. Change and stability, revolution and tradition, ideologies and institutions: all are depicted here in their immense diversity ascompeting factors in Jewish life. This book is long overdue; I can hardly think of another book in the English language that so successfully presents the full spectrum of Zionist society in pre-state times. Combining a critical approach with a sympathetic view of Israel and Zionism, it avoids thepitfalls of eulogizing or excessive criticism, finding the right balance between the two. Any scholar or student of Israeli history would be wise to make use of this book."--Anita Shapira, Tel Aviv University
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 1998
Library Journal, December 1998
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This volume traces the history of the development of the Jewish State from the early idea of Jewish nationalism and the Zionist movements in the late-19th century to the establishment of Israel in 1948.
Long Description
Israel is a modern state whose institutions were clearly shaped by an ideological movement. The declaration of independence in 1948 was an immediate expression of the fundamental Zionist idea: it gave effect to a plan advocated by organized Zionists since the 1880s for solving the Jewish Problem. Thus, major Israeli political institutions, such as the party structure, embody principles and practices that were followed in the World Zionist Organization. In this respect, Israel is similar to other new states whose political institutions directly derive from the nationalist movements that won their independence. History and social structure are inseparably joined; the contemporary social problems of the new state are clearly rooted in its history, while the shape of its future is being decided by the very policies through which it is trying to solve these problems. At the same time, there are many unique aspects to the birth of Israel. The problem to be solved by acquiring sovereignty in Israel (and establishing a free Jewish society there) was the problem of a people living in exile. The first stage, therefore, was to return to the people a homeland to which they were intimately attached, not only in their dreams but in the minute details of their ways of life. This important book studies the birth of the State of Israel and analyzes the elaborately articulated and variegated ideological principles of the Zionist movement that led to that birth. It examines conflicting pre-state ideals and the social structure that emerged in Palestine's Jewish community during the Mandate period. In particular, Zionism and the Creation of a New Society reflects upon Israel's existence as both a state and a social structure--a place conceived before its birth as a means of solving a particular social malady: the modern Jewish Problem. Jehuda Reinharz and the late Ben Halpern carefully trace the development of the Zionist idea from its earliest expressions up to the eve of World War II, setting their study against a broad background of political and social development throughout Europe and the Middle East.
Long Description
Zionism and the Creation of a New Society is the history of the development of the Jewish State from the early idea of Jewish nationalism. Ranging from the Zionist movements in the late nineteenth century to the establishment of Israel in 1948, this study clearly demonstrates the continuity between the principles and practices of those early movements and the social and political structure of Israel today. Jehuda Reinharz and the late Ben Halpern, the two foremost students of Zionism in the United States, have produced the most comprehensive and incisive history of Zionism in the English language.
Main Description
Israel is a modern state whose institutions were clearly shaped by an ideological movement. The declaration of independence in 1948 was an immediate expression of the fundamental Zionist idea: it gave effect to a plan advocated by organized Zionists since the 1880s for solving the JewishProblem. Thus, major Israeli political institutions, such as the party structure, embody principles and practices that were followed in the World Zionist Organization. In this respect, Israel is similar to other new states whose political institutions directly derive from the nationalist movements that won their independence. History and social structure are inseparably joined; the contemporary social problems of the new state are clearly rooted in its history,while the shape of its future is being decided by the very policies through which it is trying to solve these problems. At the same time, there are many unique aspects to the birth of Israel. The problem to be solved by acquiring sovereignty in Israel (and establishing a free Jewish society there)was the problem of a people living in exile. The first stage, therefore, was to return to the people a homeland to which they were intimately attached, not only in their dreams but in the minute details of their ways of life. This important book studies the birth of the State of Israel and analyzes the elaborately articulated and variegated ideological principles of the Zionist movement that led to that birth. It examines conflicting pre-state ideals and the social structure that emerged in Palestine's Jewish communityduring the Mandate period. In particular, Zionism and the Creation of a New Society reflects upon Israel's existence as both a state and a social structure--a place conceived before its birth as a means of solving a particular social malady: the modern Jewish Problem. Jehuda Reinharz and the lateBen Halpern carefully trace the development of the Zionist idea from its earliest expressions up to the eve of World War II, setting their study against a broad background of political and social development throughout Europe and the Middle East.
Main Description
Israel is a modern state whose institutions were clearly shaped by an ideological movement. The declaration of independence in 1948 was an immediate expression of the fundamental Zionist idea: it gave effect to a plan advocated by organized Zionists since the 1880s for solving the Jewish Problem. Thus, major Israeli political institutions, such as the party structure, embody principles and practices that were followed in the World Zionist Organization. In this respect, Israel is similar to other new states whose political institutions directly derive from the nationalist movements that won their independence. History and social structure are inseparably joined; the contemporary social problems of the new state are clearly rooted in its history, while the shape of its future is being decided by the very policies through which it is trying to solve these problems. At the same time, there are many unique aspects to the birth of Israel. The problem to be solved by acquiring sovereignty in Israel (and establishing a free Jewish society there) was the problem of a people living in exile. The first stage, therefore, was to return to the people a homeland to which they were intimately attached, not only in their dreams but in the minute details of their ways of life. This important book studies the birth of the State of Israel and analyzes the elaborately articulated and variegated ideological principles of the Zionist movement that led to that birth. It examines conflicting pre-state ideals and the social structure that emerged in Palestine's Jewish community during the Mandate period. In particular,Zionism and the Creation of a New Societyreflects upon Israel's existence as both a state and a social structure--a place conceived before its birth as a means of solving a particular social malady: the modern Jewish Problem. Jehuda Reinharz and the late Ben Halpern carefully trace the development of the Zionist idea from its earliest expressions up to the eve of World War II, setting their study against a broad background of political and social development throughout Europe and the Middle East.
Main Description
Two experts trace the development of the Zionist idea from its earliest expressions up to the birth of the State of Israel.
Main Description
Zionism and the Creation of a New Society is an analysis of thedevelopment of the Jewish State. Tracing the history of Zionism from the latenineteenth century to World War II, the authors demonstrate the continuitybetween the principles and practices of the Zionist movement and the social andpolitical structure of Israel today. The idea of Jewish sovereignty as the meansto solve the "Jewish problem" is reflected in the cultural, economic, and socialinstitutions of contemporary Israeli society. Jehuda Reinharz and the late BenHalpern, two of the foremost scholars of modern Jewish history in the UnitedStates, have produced a most accessible, comprehensive, and incisive history ofZionism in the English language.
Table of Contents
Studies In Jewish Historyp. ii
Prefacep. v
Introductionp. 3
the Social Sources of Zionismp. 8
the Settingp. 25
the Yishuv, Old and Newp. 46
Settlers and Patronsp. 59
the Conflict of Tradition and Ideap. 90
Zionism and the Leftp. 120
the Young Workersp. 145
Growth of the Zionist Partiesp. 172
the Hegemony of Laborp. 196
the National Homep. 229
Notesp. 273
A Note on Bibliographyp. 277
Indexp. 281
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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