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The human equation : building profits by putting people first /
Jeffrey Pfeffer.
imprint
Boston : Harvard Business School Press, c1998.
description
xix, 345 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0875848419 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Boston : Harvard Business School Press, c1998.
isbn
0875848419 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
2085820
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [307]-330) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-06:
The central thesis of Pfeffer's book is the importance of people to organizational success. Pfeffer, a well-known business school professor (Stanford Univ.), supports his basic contention of competitive advantage through people by means of anecdotal as well as rigorous empirical evidence. This sequel to his well-regarded Competitive Advantage through People (CH, Sep'94) is distinct from other books on the same topic because it zealously and convincingly makes the case that rather than in coming up with a brilliant strategy, it is in executing the strategy that enduring corporate success stories are founded. The author provides a scathing indictment of the so-called virtues of downsizing, cost cutting, and other popular strategic moves widely chronicled in the business press. However, the book is not just a critique of existing management practices. It offers and describes in detail seven people-related management practices that create the right ambience for better corporate performance: employment security, selective hiring, self-managed teams and decentralized decision making, performance-based compensation, extensive training, reduced status distinctions, and extensive sharing of organizational information. Moreover, the viability of these prescriptions is examined in terms of the contemporary business milieu. Recommended for upper-division undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and practitioners. R. Subramanian; Grand Valley State University
Appeared in Library Journal on 1997-12-02:
Pfeffer (Competitive Advantage Through People, LJ 2/15/94) argues persuasively that organizations typically fail to consider their culture and capabilities, particularly when planning for change. He addresses a number of people issues, such as downsizing, hiring practices, compensation approaches, and alignment of management practice with stated values. Although the author favors a fundamental approach, he shores it up with anecdotal information, logic, and wit, noting, for example, that downsizing does not eliminate costs but could be radically counterproductive (i.e., no expenses, no enterprise). Further, he gives examples of organizations that, while decidedly low-tech, manage to produce profits often associated with high-tech enterprises. Pfeffer further points out how a number of organizations in typically low-margin sectors outperform their competitors through an alignment of values. Indeed, Pfeffer's examples emphasize doing the right thing the right way. This book should be required reading for those planning organizational change.‘Steven Silkunas, SEPTA/FRONTIER, Lansdale, Pa. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, December 1997
Booklist, February 1998
Choice, June 1998
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is the first book to make the irrefutable business case that managing people well results in a better bottom line. The contents of this work include practical guidelines for implementing high-performance management practices.
Main Description
Why is common sense so uncommon when it comes to managing people? How is it that so many seemingly intelligent organizations implement harmful management practices and ideas? In his provocative new book, 'The Human Equation', bestselling author Jeffrey Pfeffer examines why much of the current conventional wisdom is wrong and asks us to re-think the way managers link people with organizational performance. Pfeffer masterfully builds a powerful business case for managing people effectively--not just because it makes for good corporate policy, but because it results in outstanding performance and profits. Challenging current thinking and practice, Pfeffer: reveals the costs of downsizing and provides alternatives; identifies troubling trends in compensation, and suggests better practices; explains why even the smartest managers sometimes manage people unwisely; demonstrates how market-based forces can fail to create good people management practices, creating a need for positive public policy; and provides practical guidelines for implementing high-performance management practices. Filled with information and ideas, 'The Human Equation' provides much-needed guidance for managing people more wisely and more profitably.
Main Description
Why is common sense so uncommon when it comes to managing people? How is it that so many seemingly intelligent organizations implement harmful management practices and ideas? In his provocative new book, The Human Equation , bestselling author Jeffrey Pfeffer examines why much of the current conventional wisdom is wrong and asks us to re-think the way managers link people with organizational performance. Pfeffer masterfully builds a powerful business case for managing people effectively--not just because it makes for good corporate policy, but because it results in outstanding performance and profits. Challenging current thinking and practice, Pfeffer: reveals the costs of downsizing and provides alternatives; identifies troubling trends in compensation, and suggests better practices; explains why even the smartest managers sometimes manage people unwisely; demonstrates how market-based forces can fail to create good people management practices, creating a need for positive public policy; and provides practical guidelines for implementing high-performance management practices. Filled with information and ideas, The Human Equation provides much-needed guidance for managing people more wisely and more profitably.
Main Description
Why is common sense so uncommon when it comes to managing people? How is it that so many seemingly intelligent organizations implement harmful management practices and ideas? In his provocative new book, The Human Equation, bestselling author Jeffrey Pfeffer examines why much of the current conventional wisdom is wrong and asks us to re-think the way managers link people with organizational performance. Pfeffer masterfully builds a powerful business case for managing people effectively--not just because it makes for good corporate policy, but because it results in outstanding performance and profits. Challenging current thinking and practice, Pfeffer: --Reveals the costs of downsizing--and provides alternatives; --Identifies troubling trends in compensation, and suggests better practices; --Explains why even the smartest managers sometimes manage people unwisely; --Demonstrates how market-based forces can fail to create good people management practices, creating a need for positive public policy; --Provides practical guidelines for implementing high-performance management practices. Filled with information and ideas, The Human Equation provides much-needed guidance for managing people more wisely--and more profitably.
Unpaid Annotation
How is it that so many seemingly intelligent organizations implement harmful management practices and ideas? In his provocative new book, bestselling author Jeffrey Pfeffer masterfully builds a business case for managing people more effectively--not just because it makes for good corporate policy, but because it results in outstanding performance and profits.
Table of Contents
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction
People-Centered Management and Organizational Success
Looking for Success in All the Wrong Placesp. 3
The Business Case for Managing People Rightp. 31
Seven Practices of Successful Organizationsp. 64
Aligning Business Strategy and Management Practicesp. 99
Barriers to Implementing Performance Knowledge: How Conventional Wisdom is Wrong
Ten Reasons Why Smart Organizations Sometimes Do Dumb Thingsp. 131
The "New Employment Contract" and the Virtual Work Forcep. 161
How Common Approaches to Pay Cause Problemsp. 195
Can You Manage with Unions?p. 225
Market Failures and the Role of Public Policy in Producing Profits Through Peoplep. 252
People, Profits, and Perspectivep. 292
Notesp. 307
Indexp. 331
About the Authorp. 346
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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