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Reason in religion : the foundations of Hegel's philosophy of religion /
Walter Jaeschke ; translated by J. Michael Stewart and Peter C. Hodgson.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1990.
description
xvii, 464 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520065182 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1990.
isbn
0520065182 (alk. paper)
general note
Translation of: Der Vernunft in der Religion.
catalogue key
2085057
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 423-439) and indexes.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
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"This book is the first to take account of the clarification in Hegel interpretation, and on these documents in particular, made possible by the entirely new critical edition. . . . Jaeschke is able to give fresh interpretations and new insights into long standing controversies in the field."--Robert R. Williams, Hiram College, Ohio
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1991-03:
A major critical study of Hegel's speculative philosophy of religion. Jaeschke places Hegel's work in the development from 18th-century philosophical theology to 19th-century philosophy of religion. The book consists of four separate studies: a metacritical examination of Kant's influential critique of philosophical theology; an account of the emergence of Hegel's philosophy of religion, including the Phenomenology of Spirit; in his writings from the Jena period, a detailed presentation of Hegel's attempt to recapitulate the idea of God for theoretical philosophy in his Berlin lectures on the philosophy of religion; and a critical survey of the contemporary controversy over the Christian character of Hegel's philosophy in general and his philosophy of religion in particular. While primarily a study on Hegel, the book constitutes, in effect, a major contribution to the history of German theological thinking between the close of the Enlightenment and the era of the Young Hegelians. The book is clearly written, skillfully translated, and well made. It is the ideal companion volume to Jaeschke's own three-volume edition of Hegel's lectures (Vorlesungen uber die Philosophie der Religion, Hamburg, 1983-84) also available in English as Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion (V.1, CH, Mar'85). Highly recommended for advanced undergraduates and above. -G. Zoeller, University of Iowa
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 1991
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Summaries
Long Description
Unique in both scope and critical perspective, Reason in Religion traces the evolution of a distinctive branch of Hegel's philosophy. Walter Jaeschke takes account of a sweeping oeuvre, from the early theological writings to the Berlin Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion, the latter reconstructed for the first time as Hegel actually presented them, permitting a detailed study of the development and changes in his approach. Hegel's religious thought is scrupulously placed in relation to his predecessors, contemporaries, disciples, and critics. The work begins with an account of Hegel's break with Kant's moral conception of religion, and concludes with the controversy over Hegel's philosophy of religion during the decade following his death. The author also makes a valuable contribution to present-day discussions of the task of philosophical theology in relation to philosophy of religion and the question of whether, and how, it is possible to have knowledge of God.
Main Description
Unique in both scope and critical perspective, Reason in Religion traces the evolution of a distinctive branch of Hegel's philosophy. Walter Jaeschke takes account of a sweeping oeuvre , from the early theological writings to the Berlin Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion , the latter reconstructed for the first time as Hegel actually presented them, permitting a detailed study of the development and changes in his approach. Hegel's religious thought is scrupulously placed in relation to his predecessors, contemporaries, disciples, and critics. The work begins with an account of Hegel's break with Kant's moral conception of religion, and concludes with the controversy over Hegel's philosophy of religion during the decade following his death. The author also makes a valuable contribution to present-day discussions of the task of philosophical theology in relation to philosophy of religion and the question of whether, and how, it is possible to have knowledge of God.

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