Catalogue


The Roman Empire and its Germanic peoples /
Herwig Wolfram ; translated by Thomas Dunlap.
imprint
Berkeley, Calif. : University of California Press, c1997.
description
xx, 361 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520085116 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley, Calif. : University of California Press, c1997.
isbn
0520085116 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
2075761
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 335-345) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"[Wolfram] explores the high points in the history of a number of closely related Germanic societies as they faced the power of the Roman Empire and Roman imperial society. . . . This is a learned, sophisticated, and valuable book--one which can address the interests of people on all levels of erudition."--Robert L. Benson, co-editor of Renaissance and Renewal in the Twelfth Century
Flap Copy
"[Wolfram] explores the high points in the history of a number of closely related Germanic societies as they faced the power of the Roman Empire and Roman imperial society. . . . This is a learned, sophisticated, and valuable book--one which can address the interests of people on all levels of erudition."--Robert L. Benson, co-editor ofRenaissance and Renewal in the Twelfth Century
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-03-01:
Wolfram studies the "fall of the Roman Empire" from the Gothic perspective, concluding that the transition to Germanic dominance took place "within a framework determined by Roman constitutional law and the constraints of real life." The Germanic tribes joined the Roman army and received military pay and allotments, then set up dependent kingdoms within the borders of the Empire. Wolfram distinguishes the various groups from one another in their origins, both mythic and historic, and in their interrelationships and travels around the Roman world. He discusses the translation of the Bible into Gothic around 350, the spread of Arian Christianity, and the development of "Roman vulgar law" in the Gothic kingdoms. An interesting dual biography of Stilicho and Alaric clarifies two possible roles for a Gothic general within the Empire. The book is a well-written and readable account of complex events, and makes use of contemporary German scholarship. Two maps are provided, which help somewhat, but are not really adequate to follow the peregrinations of the tribes. Upper-division undergraduates and above. E. Edson Piedmont Virginia Community College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews, September 1997
Choice, March 1998
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
The names of early Germanic warrior tribes and leaders resound in songs and legends; the real story of the part they played in reshaping the ancient world is no less gripping. Herwig Wolfram's panoramic history spans the great migrations of the Germanic peoples and the rise and fall of their kingdoms between the third and eighth centuries, as they invaded, settled in, and ultimately transformed the Roman Empire. As Germanic military kings and their fighting bands created kingdoms, and won political and military recognition from imperial governments through alternating confrontation and accommodation, the "tribes" lost their shared culture and social structure, and became sharply differentiated. They acquired their own regions and their own histories, which blended with the history of the empire. In Wolfram's words, "the Germanic peoples neither destroyed the Roman world nor restored it; instead, they made a home for themselves within it." This story is far from the "decline and fall" interpretation that held sway until recent decades. Wolfram's narrative, based on his sweeping grasp of documentary and archaeological evidence, brings new clarity to a poorly understood period of Western history.
Table of Contents
List of Genealogical Charts
Chronologies
Introductionp. 1
Kings, Heroes, and Tribal Originsp. 14
The Empire and the "New" Peoples: From the Marcomannic Wars to the End of the Third Centuryp. 35
The Germanic Peoples as Enemies and Servants of the Empire in the Fourth Centuryp. 51
Emperorship and Kingship on Roman Soilp. 102
The Hunnic Alternativep. 123
The Kingdom of Toulouse (418-507): Pioneering Achievement and Failed Accommodationp. 145
The Vandals (406-534): A Unique Case?p. 159
Odovacar, or the Roman Empire That Did Not Endp. 183
Theodoric (451-526) and Clovis (466/467-511)p. 194
A Battle for Rome (526/535-552/555)p. 224
Britain Too Was Not Conquered: The Making of England in the Fifth and Sixth Centuriesp. 240
The Burgundians: Weakness and Resilience (407/413-534)p. 248
The Spanish Kingdom of the Visigoths (507/568-711/725): The First Nation of Europep. 260
The Longobard Epilogue (488-643/652)p. 279
The Transformation of the Roman Worldp. 301
List of Abbreviationsp. 315
Notesp. 317
Bibliographyp. 335
Indexp. 347
Mapsp. 363
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem