Catalogue


We are witnesses : five diaries of teenagers who died in the Holocaust /
[edited] by Jacob Boas ; foreword by Patricia C. McKissack.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Henry Holt, 1995.
description
ix, 196 p. : ill., map ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0805037020 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
series title
imprint
New York : Henry Holt, 1995.
isbn
0805037020 (alk. paper)
general note
Series statement from jacket.
catalogue key
2074740
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [182]-186) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1995-06-26:
Born in 1943 in the Westerbork concentration camp in Holland, Boas here brilliantly unfolds the history of the Holocaust through poignant excerpts from five teenagers' wartime diaries, enhanced with skillful commentary. Predictably, Anne Frank turns up, in the final section, but, as Boas points out, ``alongside the other four diaries, Anne's looks different than when you read it by itself as the sole voice of the Holocaust.'' By the time readers encounter Anne Frank, they will have met Jewish teenagers trapped in equally tragic but even more violent circumstances in various parts of Europe, from a small Polish village to the Vilna ghetto to Brussels and Hungary. The young writers relay their hopes and fears even as they chronicle the disintegration of their daily lives. One is religious, another politically active, others wrapped up in their families-Boas points out each writer's sensitivities as he explains the terrible traps into which the individual teenagers fall. In exploring their fates, he impresses upon the reader their vitality, and, by extension, implies the enormity of the Holocaust's losses. Ages 12-up. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Holocaust survivor Boas bears powerful witness to what happened to ordinary families as they were crowded into the ghettos, persecuted, and murdered." -- Booklist, starred review "Boas ably guides the reader through these literary landscapes of hell, where none of the writers survived...[These] young people make the accounts more universal, and permit us to see the common humanity of each of these different witnesses." -- Jewish Bulletin "We are privy to the thoughts of five adolescents who wrote about, and then died because of, the Nazis' persecution of the Jews." -- Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books , starred review
"Holocaust survivor Boas bears powerful witness to what happened to ordinary families as they were crowded into the ghettos, persecuted, and murdered." --Booklist, starred review "Boas ably guides the reader through these literary landscapes of hell, where none of the writers survived...[These] young people make the accounts more universal, and permit us to see the common humanity of each of these different witnesses." --Jewish Bulletin "We are privy to the thoughts of five adolescents who wrote about, and then died because of, the Nazis' persecution of the Jews." --Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, starred review
This item was reviewed in:
Horn Book Magazine,
Kirkus Reviews, June 1995
Publishers Weekly, June 1995
Horn Book Guide, September 1995
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
We are the bleeding clouds, and from the seas of blood have we come...We are witnesses...we were brought into being by an inferno of suffering; and we are a sign of peace to you. --Moshe Ze'ev Flinker, Age 17 On the eve of Passover, 1944, shortly after he wrote these words, Moshe and his family were betrayed to the Nazis and sent to Auschwitz. Like the other four diarists in this book, he did not survive the war. But their words did. Written in the midst of "an inferno of suffering," these fragile yet powerful records are a "sign of peace" to all of us. Each diary reveals one voice, one teenager coping with the impossible. We see David Rubinowicz struggling against fear and terror in Poland. Yitzhak Rudashevski in Lithuania shows us how Jews clung to culture, to learning, and to hope, until there was no hope at all. In Belgium, Moshe is the voice of religion, constantly seeking answers from God for relentless tragedy. Finally, in Hungary, Eva Heyman demonstrates the unquenchable hunger for life that sustained her until the very last moment.Yet We Are Witnesses is not just about any single victim in the Holocaust. Author Jacob Boas, who was born in the same camp to which Anne Frank was sent, ends by discussing her famous diary. Looking back at the other four through Anne, and at Anne with fresh eyes after the others, we see the largest truth they all left for us: Hitler could kill millions, but he could not destroy the human spirit. These stark accounts of how five young people faced the worst of human evil are a testament, and an inspiration, to the best in the human soul.
Main Description
We are the bleeding clouds, and from the seas of blood have we come...We are witnesses...we were brought into being by an inferno of suffering; and we are a sign of peace to you. --Moshe Ze'ev Flinker, Age 17 On the eve of Passover, 1944, shortly after he wrote these words, Moshe and his family were betrayed to the Nazis and sent to Auschwitz. Like the other four diarists in this book, he did not survive the war. But their words did. Written in the midst of "an inferno of suffering," these fragile yet powerful records are a "sign of peace" to all of us. Each diary reveals one voice, one teenager coping with the impossible. We see David Rubinowicz struggling against fear and terror in Poland. Yitzhak Rudashevski in Lithuania shows us how Jews clung to culture, to learning, and to hope, until there was no hope at all. In Belgium, Moshe is the voice of religion, constantly seeking answers from God for relentless tragedy. Finally, in Hungary, Eva Heyman demonstrates the unquenchable hunger for life that sustained her until the very last moment. Yet We Are Witnesses is not just about any single victim in the Holocaust. Author Jacob Boas, who was born in the same camp to which Anne Frank was sent, ends by discussing her famous diary. Looking back at the other four through Anne, and at Anne with fresh eyes after the others, we see the largest truth they all left for us: Hitler could kill millions, but he could not destroy the human spirit. These stark accounts of how five young people faced the worst of human evil are a testament, and an inspiration, to the best in the human soul.
Description for Library
Boas, born in 1943 in a Nazi camp, tells about being a Holocaust survivor & of the deaths of 5 other young inmates.

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