Catalogue


A prison of expectations : the family in Victorian culture /
Steven Mintz.
imprint
New York : New York University Press, 1983.
description
xiii, 234 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0814753884 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : New York University Press, 1983.
isbn
0814753884 :
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
2073465
 
Bibliography: p. [223]-229.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
";. . .casts considerable light on the concept of family in the 19th century."
( ";. . .casts considerable light on the concept of family in the 19th century." )-( London Review of Books ),()
"It stands out as one of the few successful efforts to investigate in some detail this family nexus between culture and individual lives."
( "It stands out as one of the few successful efforts to investigate in some detail this family nexus between culture and individual lives." )-( American Historical Review ),()
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
. . .casts considerable light on the concept of family in the 19th century. -London Review of Books It stands out as one of the few successful efforts to investigate in some detail this family nexus between culture and individual lives. -American Historical Review The stereotypical Victorian family, although represented in innumerable daguerrotypes, is as much fantasy as reality. The Victorian family took many forms, and in this ambitious and highly original book, Steven Mintz enters five different homes in order to shed light on critical aspects of middle-class character and family during the era. By investigating the private lives of five of the most famous and influential novelists-Robert Louis Stevenson, George Eliot, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Catharine Sedgwick, and Samuel Butler-Mintz traces patterns of intersection between family dynamics and larger cultural problems of authority, legitimacy, and discipline in nineteenth-century Britain and America. More specifically, he explores the struggles to achieve a personal independence within a Victorian home and the larger historical struggle to adapt the older traditions of deference, authority, and responsibility to the emerging realities of a democratic age.
Main Description
. . .casts considerable light on the concept of family in the 19th century.--London Review of BooksIt stands out as one of the few successful efforts to investigate in some detail this family nexus between culture and individual lives.--American Historical ReviewThe stereotypical Victorian family, although represented in innumerable daguerrotypes, is as much fantasy as reality. The Victorian family took many forms, and in this ambitious and highly original book, Steven Mintz enters five different homes in order to shed light on critical aspects of middle-class character and family during the era.By investigating the private lives of five of the most famous and influential novelists--Robert Louis Stevenson, George Eliot, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Catharine Sedgwick, and Samuel Butler--Mintz traces patterns of intersection between family dynamics and larger cultural problems of authority, legitimacy, and discipline in nineteenth-century Britain and America. More specifically, he explores the struggles to achieve a personal independence within a Victorian home and the larger historical struggle to adapt the older traditions of deference, authority, and responsibility to the emerging realities of a democratic age.
Main Description
". . .casts considerable light on the concept of family in the 19th century." --London Review of Books "It stands out as one of the few successful efforts to investigate in some detail this family nexus between culture and individual lives." --American Historical Review The stereotypical Victorian family, although represented in innumerable daguerrotypes, is as much fantasy as reality. The Victorian family took many forms, and in this ambitious and highly original book, Steven Mintz enters five different homes in order to shed light on critical aspects of middle-class character and family during the era. By investigating the private lives of five of the most famous and influential novelists--Robert Louis Stevenson, George Eliot, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Catharine Sedgwick, and Samuel Butler--Mintz traces patterns of intersection between family dynamics and larger cultural problems of authority, legitimacy, and discipline in nineteenth-century Britain and America. More specifically, he explores the struggles to achieve a personal independence within a Victorian home and the larger historical struggle to adapt the older traditions of deference, authority, and responsibility to the emerging realities of a democratic age.
Main Description
...casts considerable light on the concept of family in the 19th century.--London Review of BooksIt stands out as one of the few successful efforts to investigate in some detail this family nexus between culture and individual lives.--American Historical ReviewThe stereotypical Victorian family, although represented in innumerable daguerrotypes, is as much fantasy as reality. The Victorian family took many forms, and in this ambitious and highly original book, Steven Mintz enters five different homes in order to shed light on critical aspects of middle-class character and family during the era.By investigating the private lives of five of the most famous and influential novelists--Robert Louis Stevenson, George Eliot, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Catharine Sedgwick, and Samuel Butler--Mintz traces patterns of intersection between family dynamics and larger cultural problems of authority, legitimacy, and discipline in nineteenth-century Britain and America. More specifically, he explores the struggles to achieve a personal independence within a Victorian home and the larger historical struggle to adapt the older traditions of deference, authority, and responsibility to the emerging realities of a democratic age.
Main Description
The stereotypical Victorian family, although represented in innumerable daguerrotypes, is as much fantasy as reality. The Victorian family took many forms, and in this ambitious and highly original book, Steven Mintz enters five different homes in order to shed light on critical aspects of middle-class character and family during the era. By investigating the private lives of five of the most famous and influential novelistsRobert Louis Stevenson, George Eliot, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Catharine Sedgwick, and Samuel ButlerMintz traces patterns of intersection between family dynamics and larger cultural problems of authority, legitimacy, and discipline in nineteenth-century Britain and America. More specifically, he explores the struggles to achieve a personal independence within a Victorian home and the larger historical struggle to adapt the older traditions of deference, authority, and responsibility to the emerging realities of a democratic age.
Unpaid Annotation
". . .casts considerable light on the concept of family in the 19th century." -London Review of Books "It stands out as one of the few successful efforts to investigate in some detail this family nexus between culture and individual lives." -American Historical Review The stereotypical Victorian family, although represented in innumerable daguerrotypes, is as much fantasy as reality. The Victorian family took many forms, and in this ambitious and highly original book, Steven Mintz enters five different homes in order to shed light on critical aspects of middle-class character and family during the era. By investigating the private lives of five of the most famous and influential novelists-Robert Louis Stevenson, George Eliot, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Catharine Sedgwick, and Samuel Butler-Mintz traces patterns of intersection between family dynamics and larger cultural problems of authority, legitimacy, and discipline in nineteenth-century Britain and America. More specifically, he explores the struggles to achieve a personal independence within a Victorian home and the larger historical struggle to adapt the older traditions of deference, authority, and responsibility to the emerging realities of a democratic age.
Main Description
". . .casts considerable light on the concept of family in the 19th century." --London Review of Books"It stands out as one of the few successful efforts to investigate in some detail this family nexus between culture and individual lives." --American Historical ReviewThe stereotypical Victorian family, although represented in innumerable daguerrotypes, is as much fantasy as reality. The Victorian family took many forms, and in this ambitious and highly original book, Steven Mintz enters five different homes in order to shed light on critical aspects of middle-class character and family during the era.By investigating the private lives of five of the most famous and influential novelists--Robert Louis Stevenson, George Eliot, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Catharine Sedgwick, and Samuel Butler--Mintz traces patterns of intersection between family dynamics and larger cultural problems of authority, legitimacy, and discipline in nineteenth-century Britain and America. More specifically, he explores the struggles to achieve a personal independence within a Victorian home and the larger historical struggle to adapt the older traditions of deference, authority, and responsibility to the emerging realities of a democratic age.
Main Description
. . .casts considerable light on the concept of family in the 19th century.-London Review of Books"It stands out as one of the few successful efforts to investigate in some detail this family nexus between culture and individual lives."-American Historical ReviewThe stereotypical Victorian family, although represented in innumerable daguerrotypes, is as much fantasy as reality. The Victorian family took many forms, and in this ambitious and highly original book, Steven Mintz enters five different homes in order to shed light on critical aspects of middle-class character and family during the era.By investigating the private lives of five of the most famous and influential novelists-Robert Louis Stevenson, George Eliot, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Catharine Sedgwick, and Samuel Butler-Mintz traces patterns of intersection between family dynamics and larger cultural problems of authority, legitimacy, and discipline in nineteenth-century Britain and America. More specifically, he explores the struggles to achieve a personal independence within a Victorian home and the larger historical struggle to adapt the older traditions of deference, authority, and responsibility to the emerging realities of a democratic age.

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