Catalogue


War, justice, and public order : England and France in the later Middle Ages /
Richard W. Kaeuper.
imprint
Oxford [Oxfordshire] : Clarendon Press, 1988.
description
x, 451 p.
ISBN
0198228732 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford [Oxfordshire] : Clarendon Press, 1988.
isbn
0198228732 :
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
2056553
 
Bibliography: p. [393]-424.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1989-02:
Kaeuper (University of Rochester), author of Bankers to the Crown (CH, Oct '73) and of numerous excellent articles, has written a superb book. It demonstrates an awesome command of the literature, a sophisticated methodology, and a wise and thoughtful historical mind at work; it is also clearly (and at times lightly) written. This book is a model study in comparative history unlike, for example, Charles Petit-Dutaillis's The Feudal Monarchy in France and England (1964), which discusses the history of the two entities in parallel chapters. Kaeuper integrates the histories of France and England with insight and with an empathy for the mentalities of medieval people and times. As his title indicates, Kaeuper concentrates on the issues of war, justice, and public order, very broadly viewed. He writes of war- and law-making, public opinion and its manipulation by the monarchs, the relation of private to public violence, and chivalry as a disruptive force in French and English society in the later Middle Ages. The author ends his work with a model conclusion. The bibliography is comprehensive, the index thorough, the reference full. A brilliant work. Upper-division undergraduates and above. -J. W. Alexander, University of Georgia
Reviews
Review Quotes
'as is always the case with this publisher, is beautifully produced ... a fascinating comparison of the conditions in which government operated and of its differing achievements in the two countries'Journal of Medieval History
'a valuable contribution ... this is a study which has set at least one reader thinking about the wider implications of the issues which it raises'Times Literary Supplement
'His long and absorbing book may, however, be fairly categorized as the best mind of constitutional history' Times Higher Educational Supplement
'stimulating and informative ... Because the examination of the interaction of such momentous forces as war, centralization of authority, maintenance of order, administration of justice, and provision of security is so thorough and so acute this study will also furnish valuable insights tothose primarily interested in the history of other times and other places.'Richard Jones, Reed College. Albion
'substantial and informative work ... Its value lies not so much in the originality of its ideas or the novelty of its sources, but in its clear and vigorous synthesis of a huge literature relating to its major themes. It is strongly comparative in approach ... Students of English and Frenchmedieval society at every level will find much to ponder in his thoughtful and authoritative work.'French History
"This subtle and illuminating book will be valued by historians and students alike....An excellent and meticulously presented book."--American Historical Review "Well written, scholarly, important in substance, and significant for the methodology of legal history because it imposes on it a societal context and subjects it to comparative analysis."--Journal of Interdisciplinary History "A superb book. It demonstrates an awesome command of the literature, a sophisticated methodology, and a wise and thoughtful historical mind at work....The book is a model study in comparative history....A brilliant work."--Choice "Arguably the most comprehensive study yet produced."--The Historian "All who are interested in this era will find [the book] to be stimulating and informative. Because the examination of the interaction of such momentous forces as war, centralization of authority, maintenance of order, administration of justice, and provision of security is so thorough and so acute this study will also furnish valuable insights to those primarily interested in the history of other times and other places."--Albion
"This subtle and illuminating book will be valued by historians and students alike....An excellent and meticulously presented book."-- American Historical Review "Well written, scholarly, important in substance, and significant for the methodology of legal history because it imposes on it a societal context and subjects it to comparative analysis."-- Journal of Interdisciplinary History "A superb book. It demonstrates an awesome command of the literature, a sophisticated methodology, and a wise and thoughtful historical mind at work....The book is a model study in comparative history....A brilliant work."-- Choice "Arguably the most comprehensive study yet produced."-- The Historian "All who are interested in this era will find [the book] to be stimulating and informative. Because the examination of the interaction of such momentous forces as war, centralization of authority, maintenance of order, administration of justice, and provision of security is so thorough and so acute this study will also furnish valuable insights to those primarily interested in the history of other times and other places."-- Albion
'His long and absorbing book may, however, be fairly categorized as the best mind of constitutional history'Times Higher Educational Supplement'a valuable contribution ... this is a study which has set at least one reader thinking about the wider implications of the issues which it raises'Times Literary Supplement'substantial and informative work ... Its value lies not so much in the originality of its ideas or the novelty of its sources, but in its clear and vigorous synthesis of a huge literature relating to its major themes. It is strongly comparative in approach ... Students of English and French medieval society at every level will find much to ponder in his thoughtful and authoritative work.'French History'as is always the case with this publisher, is beautifully produced ... a fascinating comparison of the conditions in which government operated and of its differing achievements in the two countries'Journal of Medieval History'stimulating and informative ... Because the examination of the interaction of such momentous forces as war, centralization of authority, maintenance of order, administration of justice, and provision of security is so thorough and so acute this study will also furnish valuable insights to those primarily interested in the history of other times and other places.'Richard Jones, Reed College. Albion
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 1989
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Summaries
Long Description
Ranging broadly between the years 1000 and 1400, Richard Kaeuper assesses the impact of war and lawmaking on the evolution of the royal governments of England and France. From the economic and political costs of war and the development of royal justice, to the crown's attempts to control private violence and the relationship between public opinion and government action, his book provides thorough coverage of issues of central importance in late medieval history.
Long Description
This is a study of two topics of central importance in late medieval history: the impact of war, and the control of disorder. Making war and making law were the twin goals of the state, and the author examines the effect of the evolution of royal government in England and France. Ranging broadly between 1000 and 1400, he focuses principally on the period c.1290 to c.1360, and compares developments in the two countries in four related areas: the economic and political costs of war;the development of royal justice; the crown's attempt to control private violence; and the relationship between public opinion and government action. He argues that as France suffered near breakdown under repeated English invasions, the authority of the crown became more acceptable to the internalwarring factions; whereas the English monarchy, unable to meet the expectations for internal order which arose partly from its own ambitious claims to be 'keeper of the peace', had to devolve much of its judicial powers. In these linked problems of war, justice, and public order may lie the origins of English 'constitutionalism' and French 'absolutism'.
Main Description
This is a study of two topics of central importance in late medieval history: the impact of war, and the control of disorder. Making war and making law were the twin goals of the state, and the author examines the effect of the evolution of royal government in England and France. Rangingbroadly between 1000 and 1400, he focuses principally on the period c.1290 to c.1360, and compares developments in the two countries in four related areas: the economic and political costs of war; the development of royal justice; the crown's attempt to control private violence; and the relationshipbetween public opinion and government action. He argues that as France suffered near breakdown under repeated English invasions, the authority of the crown became more acceptable to the internal warring factions; whereas the English monarchy, unable to meet the expectations for internal order whicharose partly from its own ambitious claims to be 'keeper of the peace', had to devolve much of its judicial powers. In these linked problems of war, justice, and public order may lie the origins of English 'constitutionalism' and French 'absolutism'.

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