Catalogue

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Tejano origins in eighteenth-century San Antonio /
edited by Gerald E. Poyo and Gilberto M. Hinojosa ; illustrated by José Cisneros.
edition
1st ed. --
imprint
Austin : Published by the University of Texas Press for the University of Texas Institute of Texan Cultures at San Antonio, 1991.
description
xxii, 198 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0292711387 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Austin : Published by the University of Texas Press for the University of Texas Institute of Texan Cultures at San Antonio, 1991.
isbn
0292711387 (cloth)
catalogue key
2052741
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1992-01:
Most studies of Texas history have ignored the Spanish and Mexican settlements that preceded the arrival of Anglo settlers in the 1820s and 1830s. This volume helps to fill that void by tracing the development of San Antonio in the century before the arrival of Anglos, illustrating the dynamic interchange between various groups that forged a distinctively Tejano (Mexican-Texas) community. Editors Poyo and Hinojosa provide an excellent introduction that outlines Tejano historiography and surveys the relationship between studies of the Spanish and Mexican period with more recent works in Mexican American studies. Seven essays by established scholars uncover the 18th-century roots of the San Antonio community. These essays trace the early contributions of the Mexican soldier-settlers who set up the first mission-presidio complex; discuss the contribution of the Canary Island settlers who arrived in 1731 and integrated with the presidio community; describe the work of the Franciscan missionaries; and assess the degree to which the Indians were integrated into the community. The collection reflects sound research and is properly documented. It includes a 21-page bibliography, maps and illustrations, and notes. A specialized but valuable work for scholars interested in the formative period of Spanish and Mexican culture in Texas.-R. Detweiler, California State University, Dominguez Hills
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
University Press Book News, September 1991
Choice, January 1992
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