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Lawman : the life and times of Harry Morse, 1835-1912 /
by John Boessenecker.
imprint
Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c1998.
description
xviii, 366 p. : ill., maps, ports. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0806130113 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c1998.
isbn
0806130113 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
2047210
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [343]-351) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1998-02-01:
Boessenecker (Badge and Buckshot: Lawlessness in Old California, Univ. of Oklahoma, 1988), a San Francisco-based attorney, offers a biography of the California pioneer and famous Western lawman Harry Morse. As a sheriff and private detective, Morse captured or killed some of the most notorious California outlaws, including Black Bart, the poet highwayman, and was entangled in the investigation of the death of Mrs. Leland Stanford. Tracing the growth and maturation of Morse's career, the book also reflects the various stages of California history, with special emphasis on its Hispanic traditions and the ensuing clash of cultures as Anglos conquered the region. Essays written by Morse in the 1880s enliven the narrative, offering a colorful, contemporary picture of a vanished way of life. A significant contribution to the study of the multicultured West; recommended for academic libraries and western Americana collections.‘Patricia Owens, Wabash Valley Coll., Mt. Carmel, Ill. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Booklist, February 1998
Library Journal, February 1998
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Summaries
Main Description
Harry Morse - gunfighter, manhunter, and sleuth - was among the West's most famous lawmen. Elected sheriff of Alameda County, California, in 1864, he went on to become San Francisco's foremost private detective. His career spanned five decades. In this gripping biography, John Boessenecker brings Morse's now-forgotten story to light, chronicling not only the lawman's remarkable adventures but also the turbulent times in which he lived. Armed only with raw courage and a Colt revolver, Morse squared off against a small army of desperadoes and beat them at their own game. He shot to death the notorious bandidos Narato Ponce and Juan Soto, outgunned the vicious Narciso Bojorques, and pursued the Tiburcio Vasquez gang for two months in one of the West's longest and most tenacious manhunts. Later, Morse captured Black Bart, America's greatest stagecoach robber. His exploits were legendary. Drawing on Morse's diaries, memoirs, and correspondence, Boessenecker weaves the lawman's colorful accounts into his narrative. Rare photographs of outlaws and lawmen and of the sites of Morse's exploits further enliven the story.
Unpaid Annotation
Harry Morse-gunfighter, manhunter, sleuth - was among the West's most famous lawmen. Elected sheriff of Alameda County, California, in 1864, he went on to become San Francisco's foremost private detective. His career spanned five decades. In the gripping biography, John Boessenecker brings Morse's now-forgotten story to light, chronicling not only the lawman's remarkable adventures but also the turbulent times in which he lived. Armed only with raw courage & a Colt revolver, Morse squared off against a small army of desperadoes & beat them at their own game. He shot to death the notorious bandidos Narato Ponce & Juan Soto, outgunned the vicious Narciso Bojorques, & pursued the Tiburcio Vasquez gang for two months in one of the West's longest & most tenacious manhunts. Later, Morse captured Black Bart, America's greatest stage-coach robber. His exploits are legendary. Fortunately, Harry Morse loved to tell of his feats. Drawing on Morse's diaries, memoirs, & correspondence, Boessenecker weaves the lawman's colorful accounts into his narrative. Rare photographs of outlaws & lawmen & of the sites of Morse's exploits further enliven the story. A significant contribution to both western history & the history of law enforcement, Lawman is also an in-depth treatment of Hispanic crime & its causes, immigration, racial prejudice, & police brutality - issues with which California, & the nation, still grapple today. JOHN BOESSENECKER, a San Francisco-based attorney, has written numerous articles on crime and law enforcement in the Old West. He is the author of Badge & Buckshot: Lawlessness in Old California & coauthor of The Grey Fox: The true Story of Bill Miner, Last of the Old-Time Bandits, both published by the University of Oklahoma Press. "Both buff & scholar will find Lawman a must read."--Roger Mcgrath, author of Gunfighters, Highwaymen, & Vigilantes: Violence on the Frontier.
Unpaid Annotation
Harry Morse - gunfighter, manhunter, sleuth - was among the West's most famous lawmen. Elected sheriff of Alameda County, California, in 1864, he went on to become San Francisco's foremost private detective. His career spanned five decades. In this biography, John Boessenecker brings Morse's now-forgotten story to light, chronicling not only the lawman's remarkable adventures but also the turbulent times in which he lived. Armed only with raw courage and a Colt revolver, Morse squared off against a small army of desperadoes and beat them at their own game. He shot to death the notorious bandidos Narato Ponce and Juan Soto, outgunned the vicious Narciso Bojorques, and pursued the Tiburcio Vasquez gang for two months in one of the West's longest and most tenacious manhunts. Later, Morse captured Black Bart, America's greatest stagecoach robber. Fortunately, Harry Morse loved to tell of his feats. Drawing on Morse's diaries, memoirs, and correspondence, Boessenecker weaves the lawman's colorful accounts into his narrative. Rare photographs of outlaws and lawmen and of the sites of Morse's exploits further enliven the story. A significant contribution to both western history and the history of law enforcement, Lawman is also an in-depth treatment of Hispanic crime and its causes, immigration, racial prejudice, and police brutality - issues with which California, and the nation, still grapple today.

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