Catalogue


From the Cold War to a new era : the United States and the Soviet Union, 1983-1991 /
Don Oberdorfer.
edition
Updated ed., Johns Hopkins pbk. ed.
imprint
Baltimore, Md : Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998.
description
552 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0801859220 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Baltimore, Md : Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998.
isbn
0801859220 (alk. paper)
general note
Originally published: Turn from the Cold War to a New Era : the United States and the Soviet Union. New York : Poseidon Press, c1991.
catalogue key
2025936
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [487]-517) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Gripping... Oberdorfer's detailed, balanced account describes the policies and personalities that actually changed history."-- Journal of Cold War Studies
"Gripping... Oberdorfer's detailed, balanced account describes the policies and personalities that actually changed history." -- Robert Hutchings, Journal of Cold War Studies
A reliable source of raw data for those interested in studying these important episodes in world politics from a variety of perspectives.
"A reliable source of raw data for those interested in studying these important episodes in world politics from a variety of perspectives."--Benjamin E. Goldsmith, Peace and Conflict
Gripping... Oberdorfer's detailed, balanced account describes the policies and personalities that actually changed history.
"An excellent, balanced account of the relationship between the Soviet Union and the United States during the years of the Reagan and Bush administrations... It provides an informative discussion of the demise of the Cold War and belongs among the shelves of anyone interested in that topic."-- H-Pol, H-NET Reviews
"An excellent, balanced account of the relationship between the Soviet Union and the United States during the years of the Reagan and Bush administrations... It provides an informative discussion of the demise of the Cold War and belongs among the shelves of anyone interested in that topic." -- Donald L. Zelman, H-Pol, H-NET Reviews
A highly readable and utterly persuasive account of why the Cold War came to end the way it did.
An excellent, balanced account of the relationship between the Soviet Union and the United States during the years of the Reagan and Bush administrations... It provides an informative discussion of the demise of the Cold War and belongs among the shelves of anyone interested in that topic.
The best account yet of how this astonishing transformation came about. Oberdorfer himself covered most of the important events along the way, and hence has been able to draw on his own direct impressions of what took place... An exciting and, in many ways, a strikingly encouraging historical narrative.
The most thorough account yet of what we can all agree was a crucial era in world politics.
Don Oberdorfer has dealt skillfully with an unusually complex period in contemporary history. His observations on 'the turn' in U.S.-Soviet relations provide an important and timely review of developments in the transformation from the Cold War.
Oberdorfer is master of the extended journalistic inquiry into events behind major news stories, a talent he turns to the careful reconstruction of developments between and within leaderships during these remarkable years.
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 1998
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
First published in 1991 as THE TURN, this is the gripping narrative of the passage of the United States and the Soviet Union from the Cold War to a new era. Now this widely praised book is available in a new, updated paperback edition that brings the narrative up to the dramatic collapse of the Soviet Union. Replete with historical personalities, as riveting as a spy thriller, this is an enthralling record of history in the making. 34 photos.
Main Description
An updated edition of Don Oberdorfer's acclaimed book, The Turn "The most thorough account yet of what we can all agree was a crucial era in world politics." -- Michael R. Beschloss, New York Times Book Review "A highly readable and utterly persuasive account of why the Cold War came to end the way it did." -- Fred Barnes, American Spectator First published in 1991 as The Turn, this is the gripping narrative history of the most important international development of our time -- the passage of the United States and the Soviet Union from the Cold War to a new era. Don Oberdorfer makes the reader a privileged behind-the-scenes spectator as U.S. and Soviet leaders take each other's measure and slowly set about their historic task. Oberdorfer writes diplomatic history with a vital difference: extraordinary intimacy made possible by comprehensive interviews with major figures on both sides and exclusive material from a host of other sources. Now this widely praised book is available in a new, updated paperback edition that continues the narrative up to the dramatic collapse of the Soviet Union. Replete with revealing portraits of historical personalities, as riveting as a spy thriller, this is an enthralling record of history in the making. "Don Oberdorfer has dealt skillfully with an unusually complex period in contemporary history. His observations on 'the turn' in U.S.-Soviet relations provide an important and timely review of developments in the transformation from the Cold War." -- Henry Kissinger "The best account yet of how this astonishing transformation came about. Oberdorfer himself covered most of the important events along the way, and hence has been able to draw on his own direct impressions of what took place... An exciting and, in many ways, a strikingly encouraging historical narrative." -- John Lewis Gaddis, Washington Post Book World "Oberdorfer is master of the extended journalistic inquiry into events behind major news stories, a talent he turns to the careful reconstruction of developments between and within leaderships during these remarkable years." -- Foreign Affairs
Main Description
An updated edition of Don Oberdorfer's acclaimed book, The Turn First published in 1991 as The Turn , this is the gripping narrative history of the most important international development of our time-the passage of the United States and the Soviet Union from the Cold War to a new era. Don Oberdorfer makes the reader a privileged behind-the-scenes spectator as U.S. and Soviet leaders take each other's measure and slowly set about their historic task. Oberdorfer writes diplomatic history with a vital difference: extraordinary intimacy made possible by comprehensive interviews with major figures on both sides and exclusive material from a host of other sources. Now this widely praised book is available in a new, updated paperback edition that continues the narrative up to the dramatic collapse of the Soviet Union. Replete with revealing portraits of historical personalities, as riveting as a spy thriller, this is an enthralling record of history in the making.
Main Description
An updated edition of Don Oberdorfer's acclaimed book, The Turn "The most thorough account yet of what we can all agree was a crucial era in world politics."--Michael R. Beschloss, New York Times Book Review "A highly readable and utterly persuasive account of why the Cold War came to end the way it did."--Fred Barnes, American Spectator First published in 1991 as The Turn, this is the gripping narrative history of the most important international development of our time--the passage of the United States and the Soviet Union from the Cold War to a new era. Don Oberdorfer makes the reader a privileged behind-the-scenes spectator as U.S. and Soviet leaders take each other's measure and slowly set about their historic task. Oberdorfer writes diplomatic history with a vital difference: extraordinary intimacy made possible by comprehensive interviews with major figures on both sides and exclusive material from a host of other sources. Now this widely praised book is available in a new, updated paperback edition that continues the narrative up to the dramatic collapse of the Soviet Union. Replete with revealing portraits of historical personalities, as riveting as a spy thriller, this is an enthralling record of history in the making. "Don Oberdorfer has dealt skillfully with an unusually complex period in contemporary history. His observations on 'the turn' in U.S.-Soviet relations provide an important and timely review of developments in the transformation from the Cold War."--Henry Kissinger "The best account yet of how this astonishing transformation came about. Oberdorfer himself covered most of the important events along the way, and hence has been able to draw on his own direct impressions of what took place... An exciting and, in many ways, a strikingly encouraging historical narrative."--John Lewis Gaddis, Washington Post Book World "Oberdorfer is master of the extended journalistic inquiry into events behind major news stories, a talent he turns to the careful reconstruction of developments between and within leaderships during these remarkable years." -- Foreign Affairs
Main Description
An updated edition of Don Oberdorfer's acclaimed book, The Turn "The most thorough account yet of what we can all agree was a crucial era in world politics." -- Michael R. Beschloss, New York Times Book Review "A highly readable and utterly persuasive account of why the Cold War came to end the way it did." -- Fred Barnes, American Spectator First published in 1991 as The Turn , this is the gripping narrative history of the most important international development of our time -- the passage of the United States and the Soviet Union from the Cold War to a new era. Don Oberdorfer makes the reader a privileged behind-the-scenes spectator as U.S. and Soviet leaders take each other's measure and slowly set about their historic task. Oberdorfer writes diplomatic history with a vital difference: extraordinary intimacy made possible by comprehensive interviews with major figures on both sides and exclusive material from a host of other sources. Now this widely praised book is available in a new, updated paperback edition that continues the narrative up to the dramatic collapse of the Soviet Union. Replete with revealing portraits of historical personalities, as riveting as a spy thriller, this is an enthralling record of history in the making. "Don Oberdorfer has dealt skillfully with an unusually complex period in contemporary history. His observations on 'the turn' in U.S.-Soviet relations provide an important and timely review of developments in the transformation from the Cold War." -- Henry Kissinger "The best account yet of how this astonishing transformation came about. Oberdorfer himself covered most of the important events along the way, and hence has been able to draw on his own direct impressions of what took place... An exciting and, in many ways, a strikingly encouraging historical narrative." -- John Lewis Gaddis, Washington Post Book World "Oberdorfer is master of the extended journalistic inquiry into events behind major news stories, a talent he turns to the careful reconstruction of developments between and within leaderships during these remarkable years." -- Foreign Affairs
Table of Contents
Preface to the Johns Hopkins Editionp. 9
A Candle in the Coldp. 15
The EBB Tidep. 49
The Chernenko Interludep. 79
Gorbachev Takes Commandp. 107
High Stakes at Reykjavikp. 155
To the Washington Summitp. 211
Reagan in Red Squarep. 273
The Revolution of 1989p. 327
A New Erap. 387
The End of the Soviet Unionp. 431
Afterwordp. 477
Acknowledgmentsp. 483
Notes and Sourcesp. 487
Indexp. 519
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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