Catalogue


Canada and the crisis in Central America /
Jonathan Lemco.
imprint
New York : Praeger, 1991.
description
vi, 199 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0275937186 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Praeger, 1991.
isbn
0275937186 (alk. paper)
general note
Appendices (p. [171]-190) : Excerpts from the draft Contadora treaty and the Esquipulas II agreement.
catalogue key
2005822
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [191]-195) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1991-11:
Canada traditionally has had few links with Central America. Recently, Lemco argues, the region has assumed greater importance and Canadian policy has become more activist. He summarizes Canada's increased role in five areas: Organization of American States (OAS) membership, investment and trade, development aid, the peace process, and human rights/refugee issues. Given the trend toward a hemispheric trading area and Canada's general neglect of Latin America, Lemco's study can be judged timely. However, despite considerable repetition, several pages of tables, and the inclusion of lengthy, but useful, extracts from the Contadora and Esquipulas II agreements, Lemco struggles to make a book-length study out of the topic. The fact is that Canadian policy is highly circumscribed by a desire to conform to US interests. Beyond this, policy consists of efforts to play helpful fixer and occasional demonstrations for domestic consumption of an independent role in minor matters. It is useful to record these efforts and to place them in context: this is the strength of the book. However, much of the material is poorly organized and overly descriptive and could have benefited from tighter editing.-S. McBride, Lakehead University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 1991
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Written from the perspective of a Canadian scholar living and working in the United States, this book presents the first scholarly investigation of Canadian policy interests in Central America. Lemco examines Canada's sizable interest in Central America and helps fill a gap in the literature on Canada's foreign policy. The book offers a rare look at not only Canada's Central American policy goals but how these goals relate to Canadian-U.S. relations and Latin American politics. Lemco concludes that the Canadian government does want to help encourage the peace process, reduce economic inequality, and promote social justice in Central America, while retaining a measure of independence from the United States.
Long Description
Written from the balanced perspective of a Canadian scholar living and working in the United States, this book presents the first scholarly investigation of Canadian policy interests in Central America. Jonathan Lemco examines Canada's sizable interest in Central America and helps fill a gap in the literature on Canada's foreign policy. The book offers a rare look at not only Canada's Central American policy goals but how these goals relate to Canadian-U.S. relations and Latin American politics. Lemco concludes that the Canadian government does want to help encourage the peace process, reduce economic inequality, and promote social justice in Central America. He points out that Canada's Central American policy, particularly its modest support for Nicaragua, allows it to retain a measure of independence from the United States. Historically, Canada's Central American policy is in some ways substantially different from U.S. policy in the region. The book begins with a look at Canada's transition from a country that until recently had little interest in Central America to its present position as a supplier of economic aid to the region. Lemco investigates Canada's relationship with the Organization of American States as well as Canadian commercial ties with Central America. The final chapters discuss Canada's developmental aid and the search for Central American peace. Students of Canadian foreign policy or Latin American studies, as well as the lay reader interested in Canada's relationship with Central America, will find Canada and the Crisis in Central America a valuable resource.
Table of Contents
Introduction Canada and Central America
The Transition from Ignorance to Concern Canadian Foreign Policy and Central America
Is There a Legitimate Role to Play? Canada and the OAS Canadian Investment and Trading Ties with Central America Canadian Government Developmental Aid to Central America Finding Peace in Central America
The Promise and the Reality Canada and the Peacekeeping Process in Central America Canadian Pressure Groups, Nongovernmental Organizations and the Effort to Promote Human Rights in Central America
Conclusion
Appendixes
Selected Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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