Catalogue


Writing, gender, and state in early modern England : identity formation and the female subject /
Megan Matchinske.
imprint
New York : Cambridge University Press, c1998.
description
xi, 247 p.
ISBN
0521622549 (hb)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Cambridge University Press, c1998.
isbn
0521622549 (hb)
catalogue key
2003077
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 220-235) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-12:
In this insightful and original study, Matchinske (Univ. of North Carolina) considers the significance of gender identity to the relationship of the individual and the state. Contextualized by the shifting political and religious interests of the 16th and 17th centuries, Matchinske's study uses a textually grounded and rhetorically focused case-study approach to analyze four early modern women: Anne Askew, Margaret Clitherowe, Ester Sowernam, and Eleanor Davies. The author takes up such topics as historiography and martyrdom, narrative and hagiography, morality and legislation, and spiritual and secular apocalyptic writing. She offers insightful local analyses of texts and a more general critique of the religious and political imperatives leading up to and issuing from the English Civil War. This study is informed by, and effectively complements, the work of such scholars as Margaret King (Women of the Renaissance, CH, Jun'92) and Constance Jordan (Renaissance Feminism: Literary Texts and Political Models, 1990); its original contribution is its attention to the ways that the constructed, private sense of the gendered self informs the developing nationalistic concept of English identity during this era. Faculty, scholars, and upper-division undergraduate students will doubtless find much of interest in this engaging and challenging approach to the significance of women and women's writing in early modern England. C. S. Cox; University of Pittsburgh
Reviews
Review Quotes
'... succeed[s] in emphasising the variety of early modern women's writing.' Times Higher Education Supplement
"Her book makes several important contribution to our dicussions of early modern English culture." Modern Philology vol98/4
"In this insightful and original study, Matchinske (Univ. of North Carolina) considers the significance of gender identity to the relationship of the individual and the state. Faculty, scholars, and upper-division undergraduate students will doubtless find much of interest in this engaging and challenging approach to the significance of women and women's writing in early modern England." Choice
'... is a bold and much-needed attempt to analyse the relationship between women and the state.' Times Literary Supplement
'... is a bold and much-needed attempt to analyse the relationship between women and the state.'Times Literary Supplement
‘… is a bold and much-needed attempt to analyse the relationship between women and the state.’Times Literary Supplement
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 1998
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
The period from the Reformation to the English Civil War saw an evolving understanding of social identity in England. This book uses four illuminating case studies to chart a shift from mid sixteenth-century notions of an individually generated, spiritually motivated self, to civil war perceptions of the self as a site of civil control. Each centres on the work of an early modern woman writer in the act of self-definition and authorisation, illustrating the evolving relationships between public and private selves and the increasing role of gender in determining different identities for men and women.
Description for Bookstore
The early modern period saw an evolving understanding of social identity in England. This book offers four illuminating case studies, centred on the work of women writers in the act of self-definition, illustrating the evolving relationships between public and private selves and the increasing role of gender in determining male and female identities.
Main Description
The period from the Reformation to the English Civil War saw an evolving understanding of social identity in England. This book uses four illuminating case studies to chart a shift from mid-sixteenth-century notions of an individually generated, spiritually motivated self, to civil war perceptions of the self as a site of civil control. Each centers on the work of an early modern woman writer in the act of self-definition and authorization, illustrating the evolving relationships between public and private selves and the increasing role of gender in determining different identities for men and women.
Main Description
The period from the Reformation to the English Civil War saw an evolving understanding of social identity in England. This book uses four illuminating case studies to chart a discursive shift from mid-sixteenth-century notions of an individually generated, spiritually motivated sense of identity, to Civil War perceptions of the self as inscribed by the state and inflected according to gender, a site of civil and sexual invigilation and control. Each centres on the work of an early modern woman writer in the act of self-definition and authorization, in relation to external powers such as the Church and the monarchy. Megan Matchinske's study illustrates the evolving relationships between public and private selves and the increasing role of gender in determining different identities for men and women. The conjunction of gender and statehood in Matchinske's analysis represents an original contribution to the study of early modern identity.
Description for Library
The period from the Reformation to the English Civil War saw an evolving understanding of social identity in England. This book uses four illuminating case studies to chart a shift from mid-sixteenth-century notions of an individually generated, spiritually motivated self, to Civil War perceptions of the self as a site of civil control. Each centres on the work of an early modern woman writer in the act of self-definition and authorization, illustrating the evolving relationships between public and private selves and the increasing role of gender in determining different identities for men and women.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Resistance, Reformation, and the remaining narratives
Framing recusant identity in counter-Reformation England
Legislating morality in the marriage market
Gender formation in English apocalyptic writing
Connections, qualifications, and agendas
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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