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Douglas Hyde : a maker of modern Ireland /
Janet Egleson Dunleavy and Gareth W. Dunleavy.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1991.
description
xiii, 462 p., [24] p. of plates : ill.
ISBN
0520066847 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1991.
isbn
0520066847 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
1998729
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Janet Egleson Dunleavy and Gareth W. Dunleavy are both Professors of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"This biography of a man who was not only a political leader but an influential figure in literary history . . . should become the standard work."--James F. Kilroy, Tulane University "Apart from the book's interest to students of modern Irish literature and history, this biography describes a process of linguistic and literary nationalism destined to be repeated all over the world later in the 20th century. . . . The first real description of Hyde's personality, life, and achievements."--Robert Tracy, University of California, Berkeley
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1991-11:
The Dunleavys (English/comparative literature, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee) present a labor of love. This will be the standard biography of Douglas Hyde for some time. Although an Anglo-Irish Protestant, Hyde (1860-1949) was the first president of the Gaelic League, a vital part of the Irish cultural and nationalist revival at the turn of this century. Eamon de Valera selected the aged Hyde to be the first president of Ireland (1938-45). Relying on Hyde's profuse diaries and correspondence, the Dunleavys lend a novelist's touch to their account of his private as well as public life. At home in Hyde's world of literature, folklore, and language, they are less certain regarding politics, but then so was Hyde. They make clear his ardent nationalism as well as his reservations about unnecessary bloodshed. Their evaluations of the less attractive aspects of Hyde's and his wife's personalities and behavior are gentle. No footnotes a disturbing publishing trend but an extensive bibliography. Recommended for all libraries.-J. W. Auld, California State University, Dominguez Hills
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1991-03-08:
The long, often controversial life of the first president of modern Ireland is traced in this comprehensive biography by two University of Wisconsin English professors. Born in Roscommon of Protestant gentry and expected to follow his father in a church career, Hyde (1860-1949) was drawn to the local peasantry and their spoken language. De-anglicization, the driving force of his life, was pursued in his support of Irish poetry and drama, and impelled his political debut, encouraged by Eamon DeValera, the prospective prime minister, and a network of Gaelic League members committed to nationalism. ``Known to everyone and no one,'' the authors observe, the man seen here as an affable peer of Yeats and Lady Gregory was equally comfortable in a farmer's cabin.change ok? (hyde, not lady gregory, equally comfortable in cabin?)/change good.gs A preeminent figure in Ireland's history, Hyde is drawn full-scale in this extensive, informative study. Photos not seen by PW. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Library Journal on 1991-04-15:
Douglas Hyde (1860-1949) was one of the great folklorists of modern Ireland, the founder of the Gaelic League instrumental in its movement toward independence, and finally the republic's first president. This first biography regards the man as a ``maker'' of modern Ireland in the sense of a neglected figure. While it does not contrast this maker to others or study conflicting visions of the country, this very definitive work does chart one complicated life in great detail. The elegantly written descriptions of life in rural Ireland and the helpful explanations of the Irish Gaelic language make this a thorough, accessible, consistently interesting, and ultimately satisfying biography of a modest and idealistic man reluctantly entangled in violent times. For interested general readers and scholars.-- John P. Harrington, Cooper Union, New York (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, March 1991
Library Journal, April 1991
Choice, November 1991
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
In 1938, at an age when most men are long retired, Douglas Hyde (1860-1949) was elected first president of modern Ireland. The unanimous choice of delegates from all political factions, he was no stranger to public life or to fame. Until now, however, there has been no full-scale biography of this important historical and literary figure. Known as a tireless nationalist, Hyde attracted attention on both sides of the Atlantic from a very early age. He was hailed by Yeats as a source of the Irish Literary Renaissance; earned international recognition for his contributions to the theory and methodology of folklore; joined Lady Gregory, W. B. Yeats, George Moore, and Edward Martyn in shaping an Irish theater; and as president of the Gaelic League worked for twenty-two years on behalf of Irish Ireland. Yet in spite of these and other accomplishments Hyde remained an enigmatic figure throughout his life. Why did he become an Irish nationalist? Why were his two terms as Irish Free State senator so curiously passive? Why, when he had threatened it earlier, did he oppose the use of physical force in 1916? How did he nevertheless retain the support of his countrymen and the trust and friendship of such a man as Eamon de Valera?Douglas Hyde: A Maker of Modern Irelanddispels for the first time the myths and misinformation that have obscured the private life of this extraordinary scholar and statesman.
Main Description
In 1938, at an age when most men are long retired, Douglas Hyde (1860-1949) was elected first president of modern Ireland. The unanimous choice of delegates from all political factions, he was no stranger to public life or to fame. Until now, however, there has been no full-scale biography of this important historical and literary figure. Known as a tireless nationalist, Hyde attracted attention on both sides of the Atlantic from a very early age. He was hailed by Yeats as a source of the Irish Literary Renaissance; earned international recognition for his contributions to the theory and methodology of folklore; joined Lady Gregory, W. B. Yeats, George Moore, and Edward Martyn in shaping an Irish theater; and as president of the Gaelic League worked for twenty-two years on behalf of Irish Ireland. Yet in spite of these and other accomplishments Hyde remained an enigmatic figure throughout his life. Why did he become an Irish nationalist? Why were his two terms as Irish Free State senator so curiously passive? Why, when he had threatened it earlier, did he oppose the use of physical force in 1916? How did he nevertheless retain the support of his countrymen and the trust and friendship of such a man as Eamon de Valera? Douglas Hyde: A Maker of Modern Ireland dispels for the first time the myths and misinformation that have obscured the private life of this extraordinary scholar and statesman.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Douglas Hyde and the Generational Imperativep. 1
A Smiling Public Manp. 5
The Budding Branchp. 16
The Voices of the Fathersp. 49
First Floweringp. 81
Between Connacht and Dublinp. 103
To Canadap. 137
A Different America--A Different Irelandp. 156
A Bridle for Proteusp. 169
The Happiest of Menp. 193
Plays and Playersp. 213
The Larger Stagep. 227
With the Irish in Americap. 253
Triumphs and Troublesp. 288
The Rocky Road to Revolutionp. 313
The Terrible Beautyp. 329
In and Out of Public Lifep. 345
The Road to Aras an Uachtarainp. 364
The Presidencyp. 392
Death and Dispersalp. 430
Sources Consultedp. 437
Indexp. 451
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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