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The call of conscience : French Protestant responses to the Algeria War, 1954-1962 /
Geoffrey Adams.
imprint
Waterloo, Ont. : Published for the Canadian Corporation for Studies in Religion = Corporation canadienne des sciences religieuses by Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 1998.
description
xxi, 270 p. : ill., maps
ISBN
0889202990 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Waterloo, Ont. : Published for the Canadian Corporation for Studies in Religion = Corporation canadienne des sciences religieuses by Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 1998.
isbn
0889202990 :
catalogue key
1955730
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 257-261) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-12:
Adams's monograph examines the horrible and horrifying war between France and Algeria that took place from 1954 to 1962. Though his book is neither so painful nor so detailed as Alistair Horne's A Savage War of Peace (1977), Adams presents an accurate historical account with an unusual twist, i.e., the role of Protestants and Protestantism in the Algerian crisis. Well-intentioned Protestant academics, theorists, attorneys, and of course politicians on both sides of the Mediterranean were sucked into the Algerian morass. Adams maintains that the Algerian uprising forced France and Frenchmen to confront the moral dilemma raised by the Algerian demand for independence. Were the Algerians to remain the ward of a France that had never really prepared them for inclusion into the metropole, or was the independent road Algeria sought the appropriate one to take? In the last analysis, it was President de Gaulle who forced the fateful issue. The plebiscites on which he had insisted declared for independence. The role of the Protestants in the drama was significant. As negotiators, providers of assistance to impoverished Moslems, uprooted colons, and pied noirs, Protestant congregations and their leaders provided significant aid to the dispossessed. Bibliography and index are satisfactory for the general reader. B. Rothaus; University of Northern Colorado
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 1998
Choice, December 1998
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Summaries
Long Description
Initially, when the government in Paris responded with force tothe November 1, 1954 insurrection of Algerian nationalists, Frenchpublic opinion offered all but unanimous support. Then it wasrevealed that hundreds of thousands of Muslims were herded intoresettlement camps in Algeria; that Algerians suspected ofnationalist sympathies were imprisoned in France; thatconscientious objectors were denied their rights; and that aresolution to the conflict, either by force or by peacefulmethods, was not forthcoming. When it was proven that the army wasguilty of abuses, members of the Protestant minority protested andthen laboured to educate their own communities as well as thepublic at large to the moral and spiritual perils of theseactions.Based on painstaking research and solid scholarship, The Call ofConscience: French Protestant Responses to the Algeria War, 1954-1962 reveals a rich portrait of the protest.
Main Description
Initially, when the government in Paris responded with force to the November 1, 1954 insurrection of Algerian nationalists, French public opinion offered all but unanimous support. Then it was revealed that hundreds of thousands of Muslims were herded into resettlement camps in Algeria; that Algerians suspected of nationalist sympathies were imprisoned in France; that conscientious objectors were denied their rights; and that a resolution to the conflict, either by force or by peaceful methods, was not forthcoming. When it was proven that the army was guilty of abuses, members of the Protestant minority protested and then laboured to educate their own communities as well as the public at large to the moral and spiritual perils of these actions. Based on painstaking research and solid scholarship, The Call of Conscience: French Protestant Responses to the Algeria War, 1954-1962 reveals a rich portrait of the protest.
Main Description
Initially, when the government in Paris responded with force to the November 1, 1954 insurrection of Algerian nationalists, French public opinion offered all but unanimous support. Then it was revealed that hundreds of thousands of Muslims were herded into resettlement camps in Algeria; that Algerians suspected of nationalist sympathies were imprisoned in France; that conscientious objectors were denied their rights; and that a resolution to the conflict, either by force or by peaceful methods, was not forthcoming. When it was proven that the army was guilty of abuses, members of the Protestant minority protested and then laboured to educate their own communities as well as the public at large to the moral and spiritual perils of these actions. Based on painstaking research and solid scholarship, The Call of Conscience: French Protestant Responses to the Algeria War, 1954-1962reveals a rich portrait of the protest.
Unpaid Annotation
Initially, when the government in Paris responded with force to the November 1, 1954, insurrection of Algerian nationalists, French public opinion offered all but unanimous support. Then it was revealed that hundreds of thousands of Muslims were herded into resettlement camps in Algeria; that Algerians suspected of nationalist sympathies were imprisoned in France; that conscientious objectors were denied their rights; and that a resolution to the conflict, either by force or by peaceful methods, was not forthcoming. When it was proven that the army was guilty of abuses, members of the Protestant minority protested and then laboured to educate their own communities as well as the public at large to the moral and spiritual perils of these actions.
Table of Contents
Chronology of Events
Abbreviations
Acknowledgements
Introductionp. 1
Algeria 1830-1954: A Colony in all but Namep. 11
Governor Jacques Soustelle: The Tribulations of a Jacobin Proconsul (1955-56)p. 25
1956 - Mobilizing Against Mollet: The Restiveness of the Protestant Leftp. 57
1957 - Fully Engaged: Protestants Take Sides in the Battle of Algiersp. 81
1958: Protestant Reactions to the 13 mai and the coming of de Gaullep. 109
1959 - Coming to the Rescue: Protestant Relief for Uprooted Muslimsp. 141
1960: The Moral Balance Tilts to Peacep. 163
1961: Putting Peacemakers to the Testp. 195
1962: The Spiritual Cost of a Problematic Peacep. 223
Conclusionp. 247
Epiloguep. 253
Bibliographyp. 257
Indexp. 263
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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