Catalogue


The electrical field /
Kerri Sakamoto.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Toronto : Alfred A. Knopf Canada, 1998.
description
305 p.; 23 cm
ISBN
0676971261 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto : Alfred A. Knopf Canada, 1998.
isbn
0676971261 :
catalogue key
1950546
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Arthur Ellis Awards, CAN, 1999 : Nominated
Canada-Japan Literary Awards, CAN, 2000 : Won
Commonwealth Writers Prize, GBR, 1999 : Won
Governor Generals Literary Awards, CAN, 1998 : Nominated
Kiriyama Prize, USA, 1998 : Nominated
First Chapter
I happened to be dusting the front window-ledge when I saw her running across the grassy strip of the electrical field. I stepped out onto the porch and called to her. I could tell she heard me because she slowed down a bit, hesitated before turning. I waved.

"Sachi!" I shouted. "What is it?"

She barely paused to check for cars before crossing the concession road in front of my yard; not that many passed since the new highway to the airport had been built. Shyly she edged up my porch steps to where I stood. She was out of breath, her eyes filled with an adult's burden. "I don't know," she said, panting. "Maybe it's nothing."

The sweat glistened on her, sweet, odourless water, and it struck me as odd, her sweating so much -- a girl and a nihonjin at that; we nihonjin, we Japanese, hardly perspire at all, and the late spring air was cool that day. I sat down to signal calm and patted the lawn chair beside me. She sat but kept jiggling one knee. Finally she stood up again. "Yano came and took -- ," she began.

"Mr. Yano," I broke in, though everyone called him Yano, even myself. "He took Tam out of class this morning. Kimi too."

"Tamio," I corrected her, as if I could tell her what to call the boy, her special friend. As if I could tell her anything. "A doctor's appointment, maybe?"

She shook her head as a child does, flinging her hair all about. Though at thirteen going on fourteen, she no longer was a child, I reminded myself.

"Yano looked crazy," she went on. "Like I've never seen him. His hands were like this." She clenched her fists and gritted her brace-clad teeth: a fierce little animal. "He hadn't taken a bath, not for a long time," she said, pinching her flat nose and grimacing. "Worse than usual. Everybody noticed."

Excerpted from The Electrical Field by Kerri Sakamoto
All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Globe & Mail, December 1998
Chicago Tribune, January 1999
Washington Post, March 1999
New York Times Book Review, April 1999
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