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"A policy calculated to benefit China" : the United States and the China arms embargo, 1919-1929 /
Stephen J. Valone.
imprint
New York : Greenwood Press, 1991.
description
xxii, 155 p. : 1 map ; 25 cm. --
ISBN
0313276218 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Greenwood Press, 1991.
isbn
0313276218 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
1940599
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [143]-149) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1991-12:
The events of WW I and the diplomatic decisions to omit a statement of racial equality from the Covenant of the League of Nations as well as to allow Japan to retain the Shantung Peninsula exacerbated the volatile political situation in China. Subsequently, the victors tried to stabilize conditions and to solidify the Beijing government's power by imposing an arms embargo on the country. Though well intentioned, the embargo did little to improve the situation; the Soviet Union was the only nation to benefit from it. When Sun Yat-sen failed to secure arms from the West, he turned to the Russians for assistance. The resulting Sun-Joffe Agreement was a major factor in Sun's eventual victory in the political struggle. By 1929, the US recognized Sun's successor, Chiang K'ai-shek, as the legitimate ruler of China and ended the embargo. Valone presents the events of 1919 to 1929 in a logical, readable manner. However, his failure to cite French, Italian, Chinese, and Japanese sources is regrettable. Nevertheless, his study is a worthwhile addition to undergraduate libraries.-R. H. Detrick, University of North Texas
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œThe events of WW I and the diplomatic decisions to omit a statement of racial equality from the Covenant of the League of Nations as well as to allow Japan to retain the Shantung Peninsula exacerbated the volatile political situation in China. Subsequently, the victors tried to stabilize conditions and to solidify the Beijing government's power by imposing an arms embargo on the country. Though well intentioned, the embargo did little to improve the situation; the Soviet Union was the only nation to benefit from it. When Sun Yat-sen failed to secure arms from the West, he turned to the Russians for assistance. The resulting Sun-Joffe Agreement was a major factor in Sun's eventual victory in the political struggle. By 1929, the US recognized Sun's successor, Chiang K'ai-shek, as the legitimate ruler of China and ended the embargo. Valone presents the events of 1919 to 1929 in a logical, readable manner....his study is a worthwhile addition to undergraduate libraries.'' Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 1991
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Summaries
Long Description
Stephen Valone takes the first in-depth look at the China arms embargo (1919-1929) and places it in the larger context of United States foreign policy. Until now historians have focused on the formation of the Second Banking Consortium as the U.S.'s primary weapon against Japan's aspirations in China. Valone explores the crucial role that the China arms embargo concurrently played in limiting Japan's intentions. The embargo's ostensible goal was to inhibit the flow of weapons into China forcing rival Chinese factions to negotiate their differences at the conference table. The United States' deeper motive was to roll back Japan's influence and defend its Open Door policy in China. Valone's diplomatic history concludes with a positive assessment of the embargo as a tool of U.S. foreign policy. From 1919 to 1929 the United States participated in an international agreement known as the China arms embargo. Stephen Valone's study provides an in-depth coverage of this embargo. Chapters cover Japan's wartime gains in China; Japan's apogee; ban on loans; arms embargo; challenges to the embargo; embargo success; British defense; unsuccessful attempts to strengthen the embargo; and the Soviet threat and cancellation of the embargo.
Unpaid Annotation
Valone takes the first in-depth look at the China arms embargo (1919-1929) and places it into the larger context of United States foreign policy. Until now historians have focused on the formation of the Second Banking Consortium as the United States' primary weapon against Japan's aspirations in China. Valone explores the crucial role that the China arms embargo concurrently played in limiting Japan's intentions. Valone's diplomatic history concludes with a positive assessment of the embargo as a tool of United States foreign policy.
Table of Contents
Preface
Introduction
Japan's Wartime Gains in China Japan's Apogee in China
The Ban on Loans to China The China Arms Embargo Challenges to the China Arms Embargo
The Success of the China Arms Embargo Britain Defends the Embargo
Unsuccessful Attempts to Strengthen the Embargo The Soviet
Threat and the Cancellation of the China Arms Embargo
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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