Catalogue


In the house of the law : gender and Islamic law in Ottoman Syria and Palestine /
Judith E. Tucker.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1998.
description
xi, 221 p., [1] leaf of plates : ill., map ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520210395 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1998.
isbn
0520210395 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
1937346
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 211-216) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"An original, valuable, and important study. . . . This book will quickly establish itself as a key work in the field of Middle East women's studies."--Leila Ahmed, author ofWomen and Gender in Islam "The history of women in the Middle East is seen from an entirely new perspective in Judith Tucker's rewarding study of Islamic law in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Syria and Palestine."--Shofar "Tucker presents a study of the tensions between the two traditions as acted out in the law courts in the Ottoman province of Shams...during the 16th through 18th centuries."--S. Bowman,Choice
Flap Copy
"An original, valuable, and important study. . . . This book will quickly establish itself as a key work in the field of Middle East women's studies."--Leila Ahmed, author of Women and Gender in Islam "The history of women in the Middle East is seen from an entirely new perspective in Judith Tucker's rewarding study of Islamic law in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Syria and Palestine."-- Shofar "Tucker presents a study of the tensions between the two traditions as acted out in the law courts in the Ottoman province of Shams...during the 16th through 18th centuries."--S. Bowman, Choice
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-11:
Muslim family law is an ethical improvement over the absolute patriarchy of the pre-Islamic period; patriarchal attitudes, however, continue to influence Muslim society. Tucker presents a study of the tensions between the two traditions as acted out in the law courts in the Ottoman province of Shams (anachronistically called Syria and Palestine) during the 16th through 18th centuries. Focusing on the legal decisions (ranging from liberal to conservative) in the collections of three kadis from Damascus, Jerusalem, and Nablus, the author describes the theoretical and actual vicissitudes of the woman's world in four chapters: marriage, divorce, parenting, and sexual relations. As a social historian, she shows that the sources of Islam were less important than the legally controlled accommodation to the social realities of Ottoman Shams: patriarchy, fertility, and the resultant control of the woman by the extended family and clan. The book is written from a female perspective, and the author judiciously sprinkles her text with appropriate gender language. Ultimately her sympathetic reading of the sources and Islamic tradition raises a critique of the Western feminist model of independence and equality. Useful for Middle East and women's studies. Glossary. Upper-division undergraduates; general readers. S. Bowman; University of Cincinnati
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 1998
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Summaries
Main Description
In an rewarding new study, Tucker explores the way in which Islamic legal thinkers understood Islam as it related to women and gender roles. In seventeenth and eighteenth century Syria and Palestine, Muslim legal thinkers gave considerable attention to women's roles in society, and Tucker shows how fatwa s, or legal opinions, greatly influenced these roles. She challenges prevailing views on Islam and gender, revealing Islamic law to have been more fluid and flexible than previously thought. Although the legal system had a consistent patriarchal orientation, it was modulated by sensitivities to the practical needs of women, men, and children. In her comprehensive overview of a field long neglected by scholars, Tucker deepens our understanding of how societies, including our own, construct gender roles.
Long Description
In an rewarding new study, Tucker explores the way in which Islamic legal thinkers understood Islam as it related to women and gender roles. In seventeenth and eighteenth century Syria and Palestine, Muslim legal thinkers gave considerable attention to women's roles in society, and Tucker shows howfatwas, or legal opinions, greatly influenced these roles. She challenges prevailing views on Islam and gender, revealing Islamic law to have been more fluid and flexible than previously thought. Although the legal system had a consistent patriarchal orientation, it was modulated by sensitivities to the practical needs of women, men, and children. In her comprehensive overview of a field long neglected by scholars, Tucker deepens our understanding of how societies, including our own, construct gender roles.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
The Law, the Courts, and the Muftisp. 1
With Her Consent: Marriagep. 37
Release Her with Kindness: Divorcep. 78
The Fullness of Affection: Mothering and Fatheringp. 113
If She Were Ready for Men: Sexuality and Reproductionp. 148
Conclusionp. 179
Notesp. 187
Glossaryp. 205
Bibliographyp. 211
Indexp. 217
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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