Catalogue


Bengal : the British bridgehead : eastern India, 1740-1828 /
P.J. Marshall.
imprint
Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1987.
description
xv, 195 p. : ill., maps. --
ISBN
0521253306
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1987.
isbn
0521253306
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
1918470
 
Bibliography: p. 183-188.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1989-03:
Marshall carefully analyzes the complicated process by which the British East India Company came to dominate Bengal in the last half of the 18th century. He examines in detail the situation in Bengal prior to the Plassey Revolution of 1757, and the continuity between the old Mughal regime and the new Company Raj, both of which extracted outrageous amounts of revenue from Bengali peasants for military purposes. Marshall also provides a thorough study of the arcane land revenue (zamindari) system and the various monopolies, such as salt and opium, that became mainstays of the company's power. New light is shed on the economic and social dislocation resulting from the market decline of Bengali cotton piece goods and the rise of the indigo trade. An outstanding addition to the understanding of the changes that took place in South Asia during the early years of British rule, this work should be read with C.A. Bayly's Indian Society and the Making of British India (see above). Well organized, nicely written, and well documented, it will be prized by South Asia and British Empire scholars. College, university, and public libraries. -W. W. Reinhardt, Randolph-Macon College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"The entire Cambridge series, judging from the quality of these two examples, will prove essential reading for some time to come, for both specialists in Indian history and scholars in related fields. Both authors have clearly demonstrated their control over the state of scholarship in their respective areas. These two authors, and the series editors as well, are to be commended for a fine start to what should prove to be a major contribution to the study of Indian history." Michael H. Fisher, Public Affairs Spring 1989
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 1989
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The aim of Bengal: The British Bridgehead is to explain how, in the eighteenth century, Britain established her rule in eastern India, the first part of the subcontinent to be incorporated into the British Empire. Though the British were not in firm control of Bengal, Bihar and Orissa until 1765, to illustrate the circumstances in which they gained power and elucidate the Indian inheritance that so powerfully shaped the early years of their rule, professor Marshall begins his analysis around 1740 with the reign of Alivardi Khan, the last effective Mughal ruler of eastern India. He then explores the social, cultural and economic changes that followed the imposition of foreign rule and seeks to assess the consequences for the peoples of the region; emphasis is given throughout as much to continuities rooted deep in the history of Bengal as to the more obvious effects of British domination. The volume closes in the 1820s when, with British rule firmly established, a new pattern of cultural and economic relations was developing between Britain and eastern India.
Main Description
The aim of Bengal:The British Bridgehead is to explain how, in the eighteenth century, Britain established her rule in eastern India, the first part of the sub-continent to be incorporated into the British Empire. Professor Marshall begins his analysis with the reign of Alivardi Khan, the last effective Mughal ruler of eastern India. He then explores the social, cultural, and economic ihanges that followed the imposition of foreign rule and seeks to assess the consequences for the peoples of the region; emphasis is given throughout as much to continuities rooted deep in the history of Bengal, as to the more obvious effects of British domination. The volume closes with British rule firmly established, the arrival of Lord William Bentinck, and the failure of the great Agency Houses.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title explains how Britain established her rule in eastern India. Professor Marshall begins his analysis around 1740 with the reign of Alivardi Khan, exploring the social, cultural and economic changes that followed the imposition of foreign rule.
Description for Bookstore
The pattern of events that allowed Britain to establish her rule in eastern India, as well as their consequences, are traced to reveal the effects of the imposition of foreign rule upon the subcontinent.
Description for Bookstore
This book explains how Britain established her rule in eastern India. Professor Marshall begins his analysis around 1740 with the reign of Alivardi Khan, exploring the social, cultural and economic changes that followed the imposition of foreign rule. The volume closes in the 1820s when, with British rule firmly established, a new pattern of cultural and economic relations was developing between Britain and eastern India.
Description for Library
Bengal: The British Bridgehead explains how, in the eighteenth century, Britain established her rule in eastern India, the first part of the subcontinent to be incorporated into the British Empire. Professor Marshall begins his analysis around 1740 with the reign of Alivardi Khan. He then explores the social, cultural and economic changes that followed the imposition of foreign rule and seeks to assess the consequences for the peoples of the region. The volume closes in the 1820s when, with British rule firmly established, a new pattern of cultural and economic relations was developing between Britain and eastern India.
Table of Contents
General editor's preface
Preface
Maps
The setting for empire
Late Mughal Bengal
The crisis of empire, 1740-65
The new regime
A new society?
Conclusion
Bibliographical essay
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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