Catalogue


Women of the Left Bank : Paris, 1900-1940 /
Shari Benstock.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Austin : University of Texas Press, 1986.
description
xi, 518 p., [32] p. of plates : ill., facsims., ports..
ISBN
0292790295
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Austin : University of Texas Press, 1986.
isbn
0292790295
general note
Includes bibliographical references and ndex.
catalogue key
1897661
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1987-04:
Benstock has made visible the women of the Left Bank (190040) and in doing so has forced a redefinition of what literary modernism was, who was important in it, and how it is to be defined. A ``Pound era'' conveniently focused on Pound, Eliot, Wyndham Lewis, and Joyce is the modernism that has seemed to be dying. What could be called a ``Gertrude Stein era''-defined by a group of memorable women experimenting in living as well as writing and publishing-is a modernism that may not yet have reached its peak. Benstock's revaluation of whom to look at and what to look for clearly shows that ``the shock waves these years produced are still resounding through our culture.'' Gender is the key both to this new concept of modernism and to our historic misreading of the movement. (Benstock's Left Bank fortunately extends to London and to include major figures like H.D.) Among the major figures, Gertrude Stein, H.D., Djuna Barnes, and Ana;s Nin are vitally redefined. Important roles in the modernist movement are defined for Barney, Beach, Boyle, Bryher, Colette, Cunard, Flanner, Heap, Jolas, Loy, Monnier, Rhys, Solano, Toklas, and Wharton. Modernism as we will understand it for a long time to come will be defined by Benstock's book, Noel Riley Fitch's Sylvia Beach and the Lost Generation (CH, Nov '83) and Janet Flanner's Paris Was Yesterday (CH, Jan '73). Benstock's will be the central text because of the author's authority. She includes useful notes and bibliographies. Graduate students and undergraduates in both literature and women's studies will need this book.-Q. Grigg, Hamline University
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1986-11-07:
The expatriate experience for American literati in Paris in the earlier part of this century is usually associated with male writers such as Hemingway, Joyce and Pound. In a reassessment of the period and the prevailing one-sided view of it, Benstock, editor of the journal Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature, presents the women who left their enduring mark on the cultural milieu of a nation. Through their writings, including unpublished and newly available documentary sources of the period, Djuna Barnes, Nancy Cunard, Jean Rhys, Gertrude Stein, Edith Wharton and others are revealed as significant in the development of modernism, imagism and other avant-garde movements in which they were overshadowed or ignored by their male counterparts. Not only were their experiences different from those of their male counterparts, but they were also distinct from each other. Benstock tracks the sexually liberated lifestyles and the creative originality of these women with a wealth of documentation. (December) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Library Journal on 1986-11-15:
This important study investigates a little-known aspect of 20th-century literary history. Benstock describes the lives and work of approximately two dozen English and American women who lived in Paris during its heyday as a literary center. Though many of these women made significant contributions both to Parisian expatriate culture and to modern literature, they have long been overshadowed by the reputations of their male relatives and colleagues. By examining the lives and work of such diverse figures as Gertrude Stein and Caresse Crosby, Edith Wharton and Djuna Barnes, Benstock attempts to establish what it was like to be both a woman and a writer in literary Paris at the time. A scholarly and stimulating book highly recommended for academic and large public libraries.Susan Thach Dean, Fine Arts Div., Chicago P.L. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
Benstock has made visible the women of the Left Bank (1900-40) and in doing so has forced a redefinition of what literary modernism was, who was important in it, and how it is to be defined.... Modernism as we will understand it for a long time to come will be defined by Benstock's book...
Shari Benstock... weaves together, with great skill, the histories of an extraordinary group of talented women--publishers like Sylvia Beach, Caresse Crosby, Margaret Anderson, and Jane Heap, novelists Jean Rhys, Gertrude Stein, and Edith Wharton. She examines in some depth the writing produced by poets, journalists and novelists, thus combining literary criticism and social history in a seamless running narrative.... A valuable and intriguing book.
This item was reviewed in:
Booklist, November 1986
Library Journal, November 1986
Publishers Weekly, November 1986
Choice, April 1987
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Now available in a durable paperback edition, Shari Benstock's critically acclaimed, best-sellingWomen of the Left Bankis a fascinating exploration of the lives and works of some two dozen American, English, and French women whose talent shaped the Paris expatriate experience in the century's early years.This ambitious historical, biographical, and critical study has taken its place among the foremost works of literary criticism. Maurice Beebe calls it "a distinguished contribution to modern literary history." Jane Marcus hails it as "the first serious literary history of the period and its women writers, making along the way no small contribution to our understanding of the relationships between women artists and their male counterparts, from Henry James to Hemingway, Joyce, Picasso, and Pound."
Main Description
This is an exploration of the lives and works of some two dozen American, English, and French women whose talent shaped the Paris expatriate experience in the early twentieth century.
Main Description
Now available in a durable paperback edition, Shari Benstock' critically acclaimed, best-selling Women of the Left Bank is a fascinating exploration of the lives and works of some two dozen American, English, and French women whose talent shaped the Paris expatriate experience in the century' early years. This ambitious historical, biographical, and critical study has taken its place among the foremost works of literary criticism. Maurice Beebe calls it "a distinguished contribution to modern literary history." Jane Marcus hails it as "the first serious literary history of the period and its women writers, making along the way no small contribution to our understanding of the relationships between women artists and their male counterparts, from Henry James to Hemingway, Joyce, Picasso, and Pound."
Main Description
Now available in a durable paperback edition, Shari Benstock's critically acclaimed, best-selling Women of the Left Bank is a fascinating exploration of the lives and works of some two dozen American, English, and French women whose talent shaped the Paris expatriate experience in the century's early years. This ambitious historical, biographical, and critical study has taken its place among the foremost works of literary criticism. Maurice Beebe calls it "a distinguished contribution to modern literary history." Jane Marcus hails it as "the first serious literary history of the period and its women writers, making along the way no small contribution to our understanding of the relationships between women artists and their male counterparts, from Henry James to Hemingway, Joyce, Picasso, and Pound."
Main Description
Now available in a durable paperback edition, Shari Benstock's critically acclaimed, best-selling Women of the Left Bank is a fascinating exploration of the lives and works of some two dozen American, English, and French women whose talent shaped the Paris expatriate experience in the century's early years.This ambitious historical, biographical, and critical study has taken its place among the foremost works of literary criticism. Maurice Beebe calls it "a distinguished contribution to modern literary history." Jane Marcus hails it as "the first serious literary history of the period and its women writers, making along the way no small contribution to our understanding of the relationships between women artists and their male counterparts, from Henry James to Hemingway, Joyce, Picasso, and Pound."
Table of Contents
Preface
Discoveries
Women of the Left Bank
Secret Passages: The Faubourg St. Germain
Simultaneous Existences: Four Lives in St. Germain
From the Left Bank to the Upper East Side: Janet Flanner's Letter from Paris
Settlements
Rue de Fleurus
Rue de l'OdTon
Djuna Barnes
Natalie Barney
Crossroads
En passant
At the Sign of the Printing Press: The Role of Small Presses and Little Magazines
Paris Transfer: The 1930s
The City They Left
Notes
Works Cited and Consulted
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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