Catalogue


Abraham Esau's war : a Black South African war in the Cape, 1899-1902 /
Bill Nasson.
imprint
Cambridge, England ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1991.
description
xxvi, 245 p. : ill. --
ISBN
0521385121
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Cambridge, England ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1991.
isbn
0521385121
catalogue key
1853535
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1991-10:
Early in 1901 (January 5, according to p. 120, or February 5, p. 131), Boer commandos executed Abraham Esau, a Cape Coloured resident of Calvinia, in Cape Colony, for organizing Coloured resistance to Boer forces in the area. Esau immediately became a local martyr. Nasson (University of Capetown) examines the situation in Cape Colony and claims that Esau and others like him joined the British to defend their rights as British subjects. The Boer War was not just a "White Man's War." Coloureds and indigenous Africans enlisted and fought on both sides, although, for the most part, they were used as noncombatants (see Peter Warwick's Black People and the South African War, 1899-1902, CH, Jan'84). Nasson utilized resources in both Africa and England, including regimental archives and oral reports. A useful contribution to South African history. Upper-division undergraduates and above. -P. F. Barty, University of North Alabama
Reviews
Review Quotes
' … a fascinating story, a superbly told … an outstanding work of scholarship, and superbly crafted … further studies on the black experience of the South African War will be indebted to Nasson's pioneering work.'The South African Historical Journal
' ... elegant and erudite narrative. Nasson convinces the reader that the study of war is an excellent tool for revealing the central social fissures in an historical situation, and he does so with acuity and dash.' The Journal of African History
' … elegant and erudite narrative. Nasson convinces the reader that the study of war is an excellent tool for revealing the central social fissures in an historical situation, and he does so with acuity and dash.'The Journal of African History
' ... provides important insights into our undetstanding of the impact of the war on people ... unravelling the reactions of the populace to a warr that few desired and most detested.' Southern African Review of Books
' … provides important insights into our undetstanding of the impact of the war on people … unravelling the reactions of the populace to a warr that few desired and most detested.'Southern African Review of Books
' ... there is a meaty dish here. The story which Nasson has to tell is a compelling one.' Times Literary Supplement
' ... there is a meaty dish here. The story which Nasson has to tell is a compelling one.'Times Literary Supplement
' … there is a meaty dish here. The story which Nasson has to tell is a compelling one.'Times Literary Supplement
' ... a fascinating story, a superbly told ... an outstanding work of scholarship, and superbly crafted ... further studies on the black experience of the South African War will be indebted to Nasson's pioneering work.' The South African Historical Journal
' ... very fine and compelling study filled with multiple black and white voices, as well as the sensitive interpretations of the author ... densely packed with detail and imaginatively crafted. It endeavours to capture a piece of the complexity of human experience.' Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies
' … very fine and compelling study filled with multiple black and white voices, as well as the sensitive interpretations of the author … densely packed with detail and imaginatively crafted. It endeavours to capture a piece of the complexity of human experience.'Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 1991
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Summaries
Main Description
The South African War 18991902 is no longer treated as 'a white man's war' by historians. Black South Africans were drawn into service by both sides, and the war affected the black communities in a variety of complex ways. Dr Nasson has written a closely focused regional study of the conflict in the Cape Colony, describing the dramatic participation of black people in the conduct of the war, and their subsequent exclusion from the fruits of peace. (The Abraham Esau, of the title, a patriotic coloured artisan, was murdered by Boer guerrillas.) Dr Nasson sets the conflict in the context of Cape political culture and social life at the turn of the century. This is a major contribution to South African and Imperial history.
Description for Library
The South African War is no longer treated as ‘a white man’s war’ by historians. Black South Africans were drawn into service by both sides, and the war affected the black communities in a variety of complex ways. Dr Nasson’s regional study of the conflict in the Cape Colony describes the participation of black people in the conduct of the war, and their subsequent exclusion from the fruits of peace. Dr Nasson sets the conflict in the context of Cape politics and social life at the turn of the century.
Main Description
The South African War 1899-1902 is no longer treated as 'a white man's war' by historians. Black South Africans were drawn into service by both sides, and the war affected the black communities in a variety of complex ways. Dr Nasson has written a closely focused regional study of the conflict in the Cape Colony, describing the dramatic participation of black people in the conduct of the war, and their subsequent exclusion from the fruits of peace. (The Abraham Esau, of the title, a patriotic coloured artisan, was murdered by Boer guerrillas.) Dr Nasson sets the conflict in the context of Cape political culture and social life at the turn of the century. This is a major contribution to South African and Imperial history.
Main Description
The South African War 1899'1902 is no longer treated as 'a white man's war' by historians. Black South Africans were drawn into service by both sides, and the war affected the black communities in a variety of complex ways. Dr Nasson has written a closely focused regional study of the conflict in the Cape Colony, describing the dramatic participation of black people in the conduct of the war, and their subsequent exclusion from the fruits of peace. (The Abraham Esau, of the title, a patriotic coloured artisan, was murdered by Boer guerrillas.) Dr Nasson sets the conflict in the context of Cape political culture and social life at the turn of the century. This is a major contribution to South African and Imperial history.
Description for Library
The South African War is no longer treated as 'a white man's war' by historians. Black South Africans were drawn into service by both sides, and the war affected the black communities in a variety of complex ways. Dr Nasson's regional study of the conflict in the Cape Colony describes the participation of black people in the conduct of the war, and their subsequent exclusion from the fruits of peace. Dr Nasson sets the conflict in the context of Cape politics and social life at the turn of the century.
Description for Bookstore
Dr Nasson’s regional study of the conflict in the Cape Colony describes the participation of black people in the conduct of the war, and their subsequent exclusion from the fruits of peace. He sets the conflict in the context of Cape politics and social life at the turn of the century.
Description for Bookstore
Dr Nasson's regional study of the conflict in the Cape Colony describes the participation of black people in the conduct of the war, and their subsequent exclusion from the fruits of peace. He sets the conflict in the context of Cape politics and social life at the turn of the century.
Main Description
The South African War 1899–1902 is no longer treated as ‘a white man’s war’ by historians. Black South Africans were drawn into service by both sides, and the war affected the black communities in a variety of complex ways. Dr Nasson has written a closely focused regional study of the conflict in the Cape Colony, describing the dramatic participation of black people in the conduct of the war, and their subsequent exclusion from the fruits of peace. (The Abraham Esau, of the title, a patriotic coloured artisan, was murdered by Boer guerrillas.) Dr Nasson sets the conflict in the context of Cape political culture and social life at the turn of the century. This is a major contribution to South African and Imperial history.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgement
Preface
Abbreviations
Illustrations and maps
Introduction: perspectives and place
Colonial state, imperial army and peace-keeping
The politics of patriotism
Arms and patriotism: town guards and district militia
Moving Lord Kitchener: military transport and supply work
The Republican guerrilla war in the countryside
Martyrdom, myth and memory: Abraham Esau's war
Treason offenders and their antagonists
Peace and reconquest
Bibliography
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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