Catalogue


The United States and China /
Arnold Xiangze Jiang.
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, c1988.
description
xiii, 200 p. ; 23 cm. --
ISBN
0226399478
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, c1988.
isbn
0226399478
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
1836740
 
Bibliography: p. 177-189.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1988-10:
A history of US-Chinese foreign relations from the Opium War period to 1980, written in English by a Chinese historian educated at the University of Washington. The work is an all-too-brief (one must say superficial) attempt to cover nearly 125 years in 170 pages of text. It is also tendentious, resembling very much the sort of one-sided historical accounts produced in the Soviet Union during the 1930s by Grekov and Shestakov. Chiang (Zhongshan University, Guangzhou), unlike Edmund Burke, has apparently never met a revolution he did not like. His analysis of US foreign policy is injured by his apparent unawareness of the pluralism of American society, and of the axes that different interest groups grind on Washington policymakers. Chiang is particularly incensed that President Wilson was unwilling to go to war with Japan in 1919 to preserve the integrity of China. Inexplicably, Chiang is silent with respect to any Chinese role in the onset of the June 1950 Korean War. -W. J. Parente, University of Scranton
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 1988
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Summaries
Main Description
In 1899, the United States declared the Open Door policy, proclaiming its commitment to the preservation of China's national integrity. A year later, the United States helped to quash the Boxer rebellion in Peking, a revolt which had threatened American business interests. Of these two contradictory aims displayed by U.S. foreign policy--generous friendship and aggressive self-interest--it is the latter that has prevailed and defined American policy toward China, maintains Chinese historian Arnold Xiangze Jiang. The United States and China is the first comprehensive study in English of the tumultuous history of Sino-American relations from a Chinese perspective. Jiang critically examines U.S. foreign policy toward China from the eighteenth century to the Reagan-Deng years, illustrating how America's presence, influence, and pressure have shaped the history and politics of China. At the same time, Jiang's account is an illuminating and insightful synthesis of Chinese historiography since 1949--history as it has been taught in the People's Republic of China.
Main Description
In 1899, the United States declared the Open Door policy, proclaiming its commitment to the preservation of China's national integrity. A year later, the United States helped to quash the Boxer rebellion in Peking, a revolt which had threatened American business interests. Of these two contradictory aims displayed by U.S. foreign policygenerous friendship and aggressive self-interestit is the latter that has prevailed and defined American policy toward China, maintains Chinese historian Arnold Xiangze Jiang. The United States and China is the first comprehensive study in English of the tumultuous history of Sino-American relations from a Chinese perspective. Jiang critically examines U.S. foreign policy toward China from the eighteenth century to the Reagan-Deng years, illustrating how America's presence, influence, and pressure have shaped the history and politics of China. At the same time, Jiang's account is an illuminating and insightful synthesis of Chinese historiography since 1949history as it has been taught in the People's Republic of China.
Table of Contents
Series Editor's
Foreword
Introduction
From ""Peace and Amity"" to ""Cooperation""
From Rivalry to ""Open Door""
""Open Door"" Put to the Test
""Special Interests"" Recognized
""Open Door"" Reasserted
""Open Door"" Lost
Aid to Chiang Against Japan
Aid to Chiang Against the Chinese Communist Party
Aggression Against the People's Republic of China
From Hostility to Reconciliation
Conclusion
Appendix: Names and Places in Pinyin and Wade-Giles
Notes
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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