Catalogue


The republic ; and, The laws /
Cicero ; translated by Niall Rudd ; with an introduction and notes by Jonathan Powell and Niall Rudd.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1998.
description
xliii, 242 p.
ISBN
0192832360 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
uniform title
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1998.
isbn
0192832360 (pbk. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
1836293
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'In his translation G. achieves a consistent vitality both in narrative... and in argument.'Michael Coffey, The Classical Review Vol.XLIX No.2
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Summaries
Main Description
Cicero's The Republic is an impassioned plea for responsible government written just before the civil war that ended the Roman Republic in a dialogue following Plato. This is the first complete English translation of both works for over sixty years and features a lucid introduction, a table of dates, notes on the Roman constitution, and an index of names.
Main Description
'However one defines Man, the same definition applies to us all. This is sufficient proof that there is no essential difference within mankind.' (Laws l.29-30) Cicero's The Republic is an impassioned plea for responsible governement written just before the civil war that ended the Roman Republic in a dialogue following Plato. Drawing on Greek political theory, the work embodies the mature reflections of a Roman ex-consul on the nature of politicalorganization, on justice in society, and on the qualities needed in a statesman. Its sequel, The Laws, expounds the influential doctrine of Natural Law, which applies to all mankind, and sets out an ideal code for a reformed Roman Republic, already half in the realm of utopia. This is the first complete English translation of both works for over sixty years and features a lucid Introduction, a Table of Dates, notes on the Roman constitution, and an Index of Names.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Drawing on Greek political theory, Cicero's The Republic embodies the mature reflections of a Roman ex-consul on the nature of political organization, justice in society, and the qualities needed in a statesman.
Main Description
Cicero'sThe Republicis an impassioned plea for responsible government written just before the civil war that ended the Roman Republic in a dialogue following Plato. This is the first complete English translation of both works for over sixty years and features a lucid introduction, a table of dates, notes on the Roman constitution, and an index of names.
Table of Contents
Oxford World's Classicsp. i
Oxford World's Classicsp. ii
Prefacep. vii
Abbreviationsp. viii
Introductionp. ix
Note On The Textp. xxxii
Note On The Translationp. xxxiv
Bibliographyp. xxxvi
Table Of Dates (BC)p. xlii
The Republicp. 1
p. 3
p. 35
p. 60
p. 76
p. 81
p. 85
The Lawsp. 95
p. 97
p. 121
p. 150
Appendix Notes: On The Roman Constitutionp. 170
Explanatory Notesp. 175
Index Of Namesp. 222
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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